Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 90 items for :

  • All: Living a Motivated Life x
Clear All
Author: Ido Koch

unknown factors that motivated local groups to ally themselves with these power centers. A hint of such a process is the increase in the local use of Egyptian amulets, substituting locally produced amulets. The main outcome here of note is that this practice was shared by both Egyptians and locals for

In: Colonial Encounters in Southwest Canaan during the Late Bronze Age and the Early Iron Age

points of view and based on various theories in use. 4 In the history of research into emotions, 5 classical historians and philosophers (see below) have treated human emotional life as the expression of mind and body. In 1890, based on a study of facial expressions, Darwin proposed that human

In: The Expression of Emotions in Ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia
Author: Ulrike Steinert

internal organs. Only some phrases are free of this ambiguity, such as the “pounding heart” ( libbu+nakādu/tarāku ), which is encountered as a physical sign of life and as an idiom for fear: Gilgamesh Epic VIII  58: he touched his heart ( libbu ), but (felt that) it was not

In: The Expression of Emotions in Ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia

Baghdad stands, like an Island, in the midst of a vast pestilent marsh”, as he wrote to Sir Stratford Canning on 6 November ( Add. MS . 38.943, f. 11r). Nevertheless Layard’s “old enemy, intermittent fever” did not completely restrict his enjoyment of Baghdad social life, as he reported to his friend Ross

In: The British Museum’s Excavations at Nineveh, 1846–1855
Author: Brian McKnight

daughters as dowry at marriage and bequeathing the family estate in equal portions to sons upon the deaths of the parents, was distorted when both parents died with- out there being a living son, a situation called the extinguishing of the household ( jeuhu ). Under some dynasties the state attempted to

In: Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient
Author: Lallanji Gopal

) records the gift of a field for providing clothes for certain ascetics living in one of the Nasik caves. The Junnar inscriptions supply . significant instances of private transfers of land and of the gift of small units of agricultural land, owned by individual proprietors 2). The evidence of the two

In: Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient
Author: Michal Biran

thirds of the Old World. It is also because Chinggis Khan and his heirs who established this huge empire in the 13th century were nomads, for whom mobility was a fundamental part of their culture and way of life. The only way in which the Mongols, who by the time of Chinggis Khan numbered less than a

In: Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient

the great supporter of religious and municipal life and institutions, and espe- cially higher education. 10 What conferred a unique historical signi cance on the public good waqf , was the fact that for hundreds of years it provided the only regular nancial support for the medresa , a provider of

In: Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient
Author: Joann Scurlock

passage). Ere s kigal demands that Nergal be sent back to become her husband or else she will send up the dead to devour the living (for a translation of the passage in question, see A. Kirk Grayson, “Akkadian Myths and Epics” in James B. Pritchard, ed., Ancient Near Eastern Texts Relating to the Old

In: NIN
Author: Jack Goldstone

century. 3 ) But ÒmodernityÓ is also a sociological term, and it is there that we can fi nd the roots of the idea of the ÒearlyÓ modern. Sociology was born in the years 1780 to 1860 in the works of Henri de Saint-Simon, Auguste Comte, John Stuart Mill, Karl Marx, and Alexis de Tocqueville. Living at the

In: Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient