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Author: Tero Alstola

, there are no material remains which can be linked to deportees living in Babylonia in the sixth and fifth centuries bce . 1262 When it comes to written sources, it is evident that a wealth of texts was produced in Babylonia during those two hundred years. Even the tiny portion that has come to us

Open Access
In: Judeans in Babylonia
Author: Tero Alstola

Persian royalty were administered and their fields were cultivated. Despite the absence of Judeans, the presence of people with non-Akkadian names and the twin town of Hazatu suggest that groups of foreign origin were living in the villages surrounding the crown prince’s estate. 824 Second, there are a

Open Access
In: Judeans in Babylonia
Author: Seth Sanders

divine justice concludes with a message from the enthroned deity, chastening the protagonist into a conversion, a sweeping change in his personality and behavior when he returns to earthly life. These features make it both unique in the ancient Near East and intrigu- ingly similar to a well

In: Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions
Author: Jonathan Yogev

lands and ancient Israel shared a close native pantheon from which the concept of the Rephaim emerge. When a more absolute monotheistic approach motivated scribes to deny different aspects of the divinity of other beings, the Rephaim were included as well, as demonstrated in this chapter. Many clues in

In: The Rephaim
Author: Rita Lucarelli

beings, which can influence daily life on earth as well as the deceased’s journey in the Netherworld. In other words, we are not dealing with a cultural process according to which new beliefs gain a prominent role on the older: in fact, the older religious principles are combined and elaborated by the

In: Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions

seen as an element within political life, not as the means to overcome the primordial with the political. Accordingly, in the Baal Cycle political rule and the eradication of disorder do not necessarily go hand-in-hand. The lack of a succession narrative belongs among the various literary means by

In: Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions

-European was motivated by a split within the preexisting PIE animate gender and that the split was sex-based”, and he notes (as Luraghi does in 2011, though not in 2009b) that Meillet had already proposed in 1931 that the PIE feminine arose within the “common” or “animate” gender: “that the creation of the

In: Hrozný and Hittite

-ìl-qé ] a-di muḫ [- ḫi-ka ù i-te-zi-ib ] ˹uru˺ [ Gub-la ]. 108 Rainey translates: “the deities, my life” ( EAC 1:668–9), though ba-al-ṭì appears to be singular not plural. Moran, who translates “along with (my) living god,” interprets this reference to the “living god” in light of the reference

In: Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions
Author: Jonathan Yogev

” or “men” also appears in KTU 1.22, I , 6–7 as a part of the word-pair mtm // ǵzrm (“heroes”//”warriors”) regarding the Rpʾum . 32 The same word-pair is used to describe Dānʾilu in this fragment, and in other places too. The starting point of this study is to see the Rpʾum as living

In: The Rephaim

destroyed . . . next there is our common identity as Greeks (τὸ ΕἩλληνικόν), since we share the same blood (ὅµαιµον) and the same tongue (ὁµόγλωσσον), and our common temples of the gods and sacrifices (θεῶν ἱδρύµατά τε κοινὰ καὶ θυσίαι) and common way of life (ἤθεά τε ὁµότροπα). It would not be a good thing

In: Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions