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Author: Tero Alstola

, there are no material remains which can be linked to deportees living in Babylonia in the sixth and fifth centuries bce . 1262 When it comes to written sources, it is evident that a wealth of texts was produced in Babylonia during those two hundred years. Even the tiny portion that has come to us

In: Judeans in Babylonia
Author: Tero Alstola

Persian royalty were administered and their fields were cultivated. Despite the absence of Judeans, the presence of people with non-Akkadian names and the twin town of Hazatu suggest that groups of foreign origin were living in the villages surrounding the crown prince’s estate. 824 Second, there are a

In: Judeans in Babylonia
Author: Keith Dickson

, each meant in its way to serve as the emplacement of a life. Relatively permanent, all three are also lamentably empty and mute—except insofar as the inscribed tablet always remains open to speak once again if filled by living voices. I say out loud the words he wrote. My voice each time breathes

In: Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions

Classical Greeks, for example, typically buried their dead outside city walls so that the cemeteries could be as far removed as possi- ble from people’s daily activity. Sourvinou-Inwood (1995: 433-434) explains this “‘expulsion’ of the dead from living space” as motivated partly by a fear of pol- lution, or

In: Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions
Author: Seth Sanders

divine justice concludes with a message from the enthroned deity, chastening the protagonist into a conversion, a sweeping change in his personality and behavior when he returns to earthly life. These features make it both unique in the ancient Near East and intrigu- ingly similar to a well

In: Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions
Author: Rita Lucarelli

beings, which can influence daily life on earth as well as the deceased’s journey in the Netherworld. In other words, we are not dealing with a cultural process according to which new beliefs gain a prominent role on the older: in fact, the older religious principles are combined and elaborated by the

In: Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions
Author: Julia Krul

, since it was home to both human raiders and supernatural forces of chaos. As such, the steppe formed a threshold to the netherworld that was altogether inaccessible to living mortals. The word ṣēru , “steppe/wilderness,” was one of the literary names for the netherworld. 13 Ablution rituals were often

In: Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions

seen as an element within political life, not as the means to overcome the primordial with the political. Accordingly, in the Baal Cycle political rule and the eradication of disorder do not necessarily go hand-in-hand. The lack of a succession narrative belongs among the various literary means by

In: Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions

evolving reception and disintegration of what may once have been or become a single myth. At best, the textual evidence at our disposal amounts to a set of ‘fossilised’ snapshots of a living and developing tradition. The challenge of the ‘historical mythologist’ is to try and identify conceptual ‘bridges

In: Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions
Author: Ian Moyer

whether the distinction between eastern and western economic patterns was as salient a factor in motivating the movement of specialists as Burkert’s model suggests, or whether this model accepts too easily a Herodotean view and certain metanarratives inherited from theories of the ancient economy. Models

In: Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions