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Author: Ido Koch

unknown factors that motivated local groups to ally themselves with these power centers. A hint of such a process is the increase in the local use of Egyptian amulets, substituting locally produced amulets. The main outcome here of note is that this practice was shared by both Egyptians and locals for

In: Colonial Encounters in Southwest Canaan during the Late Bronze Age and the Early Iron Age

points of view and based on various theories in use. 4 In the history of research into emotions, 5 classical historians and philosophers (see below) have treated human emotional life as the expression of mind and body. In 1890, based on a study of facial expressions, Darwin proposed that human

In: The Expression of Emotions in Ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia
Author: Ulrike Steinert

internal organs. Only some phrases are free of this ambiguity, such as the “pounding heart” ( libbu+nakādu/tarāku ), which is encountered as a physical sign of life and as an idiom for fear: Gilgamesh Epic VIII  58: he touched his heart ( libbu ), but (felt that) it was not

In: The Expression of Emotions in Ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia
Author: Arlette David

× ? 1.1.5 Royal Horses The horses, paired as a team to the chariot, are major actors in the royal journey scenes, highlighted by positioning, motion markers, relief depth, color, accessories, and size, the King’s horses being the largest living bodies in the pictures

In: Renewing Royal Imagery
Author: Arlette David

, Kush, and all lands tremble for you, their arms for you in salute to your ka, begging for life as a voiceless man, being about: “Give us breath,” the fear of you blocking their nose, the end of their prosperity. See your power over them as a blow. Now your roar has ruined their body like fire consuming

In: Renewing Royal Imagery
Author: Arlette David

transformed into a banquet (festive gathering, drinking party) 100 in Dynasty 18, marks the perpetual interaction between the deceased, his material sustenance, and the living. 101 Some of the depicted participants at the feast are dead, sitting ‘like he used to when he was on earth’ ( mi҆ sḫr.f n wn

In: Renewing Royal Imagery
Author: Arlette David

) 1.1.1 The Actors The number of actors varies considerably in the scenes. 1.1.1.1 Aten Akhenaten used the image of an orb with a frontal cobra to which a life sign is appended and rays ending in hands to represent his god Aten, an abstract

In: Renewing Royal Imagery

, a style that he believed derived from Tanis Tanis under the influence of Asiatic populations living in the Delta. 6 He supported Golenischeff’s dating of the sphinxes; however, he ascribed the Nilotic dyads to Ramses II Ramses II and Cairo CG 395 Cairo CG 395 to the Hyksos (pls. XXXIX, XL ). J

In: Visualizing Coregency

specific, living individual – thus offering more room for interpretation and acceptance of differing artistic conventions. 14 Further complicating this issue is the idea that a portrait is created primarily for aesthetic reasons, while a representation serves additional functional or ideological purposes

In: Visualizing Coregency

.w-msi҆-sw Mri҆.y-I҆mn.w ḳn m ꜥnḫ Etymology ( I ): The toponym is a genitive construction between a royal personal name, with an epithet ḳn m ꜥnḫ ‘brave in life’, and the hydrographic term ẖnm.t ‘well’. Location ( I ): Given the inscription at Umm

In: Toponymy on the Periphery