Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 20 items for :

  • All: Living a Motivated Life x
  • Art History x
Clear All
Author: Pamela M. Jones

Baronio (1538–1607), and Robert Bellarmine (1542–1621). Each book is hundreds of pages long and treats a single life; there are no collected lives of this group. It is noteworthy that all the authors consistently emphasize that the individual’s exemplarity rested partly on his desire not to be elevated

In: A Companion to the Early Modern Cardinal
Author: Claire Farago

editions. There were several ways for seventeenth-century printmakers to earn a living. They could sell prints directly to the public, work on commissions for wealthy families, sell their copperplates to print publishers, or dedicate prints to illustrious persons and present the patron with copies in

In: The Fabrication of Leonardo da Vinci’s Trattato della pittura (2 vols.)
Author: Claire Farago

ms C, a treatise on optics begun in 1490, and the nearly contemporaneous Paris ms A, with its extensive notes on the elementary training of painters and workshop practices. By 1489 Leonardo was also undertaking anatomical studies (including the famous skull studies of that year) motivated partly

In: The Fabrication of Leonardo da Vinci’s Trattato della pittura (2 vols.)

and promulgate exemplary models for the Christian life, and which also justified them with reference the same overarching continuum of ideals – a continuum which also gave birth to many other forms of writing, including about cardinals. Treatises on the “ideal cardinal” and hagiographies of specific

In: A Companion to the Early Modern Cardinal
Author: Paolo Brenni

cities, and extreme pollution in certain areas), living standards for millions of people improved with better food and housing, improved sanitation and hygiene, more efficient communications, and so on. The progress of science and technology seemed to promise a brighter future for everybody. Scientists

In: Nuncius

one facet of a larger repertoire of practices centered around ritualized and often public acts of donation, commemoration, and memorialization. Donations were motivated by the desire to gain religious ‘merit’ which accrued to the donors and their family members, living and deceased, by virtue of these

In: Mapping the Pāśupata Landscape

without death, and that death conditions the living body of the infant, forever obliging believers to ponder the fragility of existence and the cyclical nature of sacred time. The wounds inflicted on the adult’s body infect life with a force that is repugnant but irresistible, divesting it of the

In: Sacred Skin: The Legend of St. Bartholomew in Spanish Art and Literature

bifurcation between issues of life/death, salvation/damnation, and despair/redemption. 8 The location of Bartholomew’s ministry is equally uncertain. In some of the earliest extant testimonies, the saint toils in Egypt after the death of Christ, drawing perhaps on his experiences as a prince of the

In: Sacred Skin: The Legend of St. Bartholomew in Spanish Art and Literature
Author: Karen Stock

the modern era. Denis chose a more nuanced path that showed both a profound respect for the Byzantine works he saw in Italy as well as a creative adaptability that restores the living religious spirit of Byzantium. Scholarship today would be enriched if art historians could adopt Denis’s ability to

In: Byzantium in Dialogue with the Mediterranean
Author: Paul Bevan

, the male protagonist’s perambulations round the city, and notably, from a textual perspective, the likening of punctuation marks on the page to living things – in this case ants. In later life Hei Ying pointed to Mu Shiying’s interest in the writings of John Dos Passos (1896–1970), and a nod towards

In: ‘Intoxicating Shanghai’ – An Urban Montage