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Author: Janne Tapper

the opposite of necessities by which human mind idealizes permanent structures (see Michelman 2010, 106, 235–236). French philosopher and author Albert Camus argues that people idealize reasons to make life worth living; people cannot endure a lucid groundlessness of existence (1990, 1–9). He notes

In: Theatre Scandals
Author: Willmar Sauter

her portrayal of the Egyptian Queen, an outrageous sum that had never hitherto been paid to movie stars. 1 During the shooting, Elizabeth Taylor, living in a suite of the Dorchester Hotel in London, fell ill and was finally taken to hospital by ambulance, but only after the world’s gossip press had

In: Theatre Scandals

humanists continued this learned tradition. 19 Marsilio Ficino’s De triplici vita , a 1489 treatise dedicated to the health of scholars, helped to establish a popular genre of advice literature on living a long and healthy life. According to Ficino, intellectuals suffered from melancholic temperaments

In: Visualizing the Past in Italian Renaissance Art 
Author: Andreas Kotte

answer to the question whether he liked Hirschhorn’s work was: “Let’s put it this way: I do not intend to buy his work for my living room”. He added that he did not have the financial resources to buy this work of art. However, he would not retrench on giving credit to Pro Helvetia: “I am a liberal

In: Theatre Scandals
Author: David Collins*

sort of life is to lead. 41 Aristotle notes that all our actions aim at a desired end we take to be good, and distinguishes between two sorts of “good”: provisional goods that are good for something as means to further ends also held to be good, and the highest good, at which all provisional

In: Imagination and Art: Explorations in Contemporary Theory

compromise human sexual reproductivity. The answer I offer is that doing so discloses how mimetic representation covers up the scarcely imaginable inescapability of a violence that is constitutive of life if not of being, that imposes a non-transcendable costliness to existence, and that renders human first

In: Imagination and Art: Explorations in Contemporary Theory
Author: Wendy Wheeler

relations we call “imagination.” Going deeper into the layers of living being, and thinking about the many varied organisms that populate the Earth, the self is also, perhaps equally surprisingly, a sign relation. This claim applies to all living organisms, not just humans. Semiosis runs throughout nature

In: Imagination and Art: Explorations in Contemporary Theory

contextual reasons for people to experience this symptom, i.e., many factors involving a flow break. Boredom was a normal part of the daily life of men and women, and literature genuinely represented this (Martin, Sadlo, and Stew, 2006 ). Boredom was the result of massive transformations generated during

In: The Culture of Boredom

contextual reasons for people to experience this symptom, i.e., many factors involving a flow break. Boredom was a normal part of the daily life of men and women, and literature genuinely represented this (Martin, Sadlo, and Stew, 2006 ). Boredom was the result of massive transformations generated during

In: The Culture of Boredom
Author: Janne Tapper

the opposite of necessities by which human mind idealizes permanent structures (see Michelman 2010, 106, 235–236). French philosopher and author Albert Camus argues that people idealize reasons to make life worth living; people cannot endure a lucid groundlessness of existence (1990, 1–9). He notes

In: Theatre Scandals