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life is insignifi cant in comparison to the awesomeness of nature. RELIGION – GIFTS FROM NATURE Todayʼs mechanisation, industrial rationalisation and technology do not alter Mongolian beliefs of life and death. Nature remains where they dwell and what their living relies on. A poem ‘My Motherlandʼ (D

In: Inner Asia

spaces, the urbanised way of life in which people were forced to participate minimised the influence of adults on their children’s socialisation. The adults spent a large part of their time outside the home, time which was devoted to the resolution of problems of living. In the context of an almost

In: Inner Asia
Author: Cara Kerven

of Muslim identity, these “life-cycle” events have also been analyzed for their capacity to enact community membership. 48 For Svetlana Jacquesson, a Durkheimian quality is emphasized with participation as a means through which the “social identity” or “solidarity” of the living is affirmed

In: Central Asian Affairs
Author: Eleanor Peers

E LEANOR P EERS 65 Youth and ‘The Movement’ – Social Life in a Rural District of Buryatia A NATOLIY B RESLAVSKY 83 The Adaptation of Young Rrural Buryats to Ulan-Ude’s Urban and Educational Space A NNA B UYANOVA 97 ‘With Poem-Bullets Around Our Waist’: A Translation of Choinom’s Poem ‘Buriad’ With

In: Inner Asia
Author: Bruce Huett

a respected member of the Royal Asiatic Society and the first woman to be employed by the Cambridge University Library. This article explores the rela- tionship between the life of this eccentric woman and oriental books and manuscripts, against the background of the rapidly transforming society of

In: Inner Asia

she shows how Buryats have a distinctive set of attitudes related to their historical way of life and values. After three years of agricultural reform, it is now possible to evaluate its conse- quences in the Russian regions. We are concerned here with the consolidation of the ways of behaving

In: Inner Asia

a return to a semi- settled, pastoral economy. Anatoly Khazanov and Kenneth Shapiro (2005: 524) have suggested that a ‘traditional’ pastoralist way of life and culture in the region were irreversibly destroyed. hugh Seton- Watson (1961: 59) sees collectivisation as ‘an arbitrary end of the nomadic

In: Inner Asia
Author: Eleanor Peers

China at the beginning of the twentieth century, to escape both the Tsarist and Soviet governments. These communities maintained pre-revolutionary non-Russian cultures and ways of life to a much greater extent than the Buryats and Evenk living on Russian territory, since they were not as heavily

In: Inner Asia
Author: Marina Mongush

the adaptation of ingrained pre-Soviet and Soviet cultural habits to a rapidly changing context. The impetus for this adaptation process originally arose from the huge changes that accompanied the sovietisation of Tuva, which began in the 1930s . The Soviet regime transformed the Tuvan way of life

In: Inner Asia

153 had little or no experience in herding. As they became totally absorbed in the daily local struggles to make a living, their sense of one Mongolian nation gradu- ally weakened and perhaps reverted to a more local, pre-1206 concept of nation. Yet at the highest levels of leadership, the idea of

In: Inner Asia