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oral arguments, the author turns to the work of Robert Audi and his concept of a theo-ethical equilibrium. Audi argues that mature, rational, religious people living in a liberal democracy will seek at least a measure of “reflective equilibrium among their beliefs and attitudes grounded in religious

In: Philippine Political Science Journal

mourn an elderly person who has lived a life worthy of emulation and has departed at an age that is the envy of the living. In such a context, the mood is not that of lamentation but rather a celebratory one. Consequently, dirges in such circumstances in the Paasaala context are used to teach communal

In: Manusya: Journal of Humanities

” becomes the figure that could be noticed as living but could not be recognized as having life (Aldridge Foster 2016). Precarity in politically-induced wars translates into worsening social and economic networks of support for those who are in danger of not meeting the requirements of a recognizable

In: Philippine Political Science Journal

the Patani Malay dialect, a dialect spoken by Malay-Muslims living in the provinces of Pattani, Yala, and Narathiwat. Although they use the same dialect, there may be some differences across the provinces. Patani Malay is the most popular dialect in the southern part of Thailand (Royal Institute 2010

In: Manusya: Journal of Humanities

this system of representa- tion within a singular place and therefore foreclose the possibility of examining other levels of meaning that may have motivated its creation and affected its reception. 334 DIANE M . O ’ DONOGHUE In opposition to the recording function of written language, the imagery

In: Journal of East Asian Archaeology

often frequent occurrence of the following subjects or themes in wall decora- tion, painted or carved in stone: the tomb occupant(s), some times at a banquet, usually with scenes from his and/or her life; wrestlers, acrobats, dancers, and other entertainment for the occupant; mounted fi gures, including

In: Journal of East Asian Archaeology
Author: Tsang Cheng-Hwa

and utilized starch-containing plants, fibrous plants, fruit-bearing plants, and oil-yielding plants (Yang 1991). It seems likely that the inhabitants of adjacent areas of southern China also made full use of the botanical resources in their living areas. By the Middle Neolithic, a greater number of

In: Journal of East Asian Archaeology

region derives from Jin 晉 dynasty ( ad 265–419) and later historical writ- ings, which imposed a tendentious reading upon their Han 漢 sources. According to Qu, this spurious claim of early precedent may have been motivated by wishful thinking on the part of immigrants from the north, who hoped to imbue

In: Journal of East Asian Archaeology
Author: Peng Bangben

). It appears that the Cancong was the earliest among the ancient clans of the Shu area to obtain a name. This name probably derived from their living place where jagged rocks “looked like clusters of silkworms.” 4 According to the Xian Shu ji ҅✗⥆ , “the Cancong people initially lived in the stone caves

In: Journal of East Asian Archaeology
Author: Heather Stur

their children, and Phan Boi Chau had encouraged young people to make their own living rather than relying on their parents or a spouse. Many young intellectuals felt as though they had to cut ties with either tradition or modernity to release the tension, when what they wanted most was to move into a

In: Journal of American-East Asian Relations