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Author: Tanya Riches

greatly affected by colonization, and the “Blackbirding.” This resulted in a fundamental cultural inequity between those living “on country” versus the diaspora. Sometimes, urban participants’ links to land and culture has been broken entirely, particularly for members of the Stolen Generation, and where

In: Worship and Social Engagement in Urban Aboriginal-led Australian Pentecostal Congregations
Author: Tanya Riches

viewed their own history ( Said 1979 , 40). He uses the example of an instruction book that deals with a fierce lion, the printing of which only increases public perception of the lion’s fierceness, challenging lion tamers to dream of its conquest. He thus states, “this side lives its own life, as books

In: Worship and Social Engagement in Urban Aboriginal-led Australian Pentecostal Congregations
Author: Tanya Riches

articulated that they were indeed living “the good life” and moving towards their imagined future. Others struggled to imagine how anything good could come of their local situation. To move forward required (re)imagination, or a restoration of their current lives and world. As noted in Table 9.1, the wider

In: Worship and Social Engagement in Urban Aboriginal-led Australian Pentecostal Congregations

convention concluded in 1930 by some 40 nations, which prohibited any state from affording diplomatic protection to one of its nationals living in any other state of which that person is also a subject. 87 As things would turn out, the nationality issue of overseas Chinese in the archipelago would not be

In: Forgotten Diplomacy