Search Results

-Period ōjōden —in which salvation is portrayed as the culmination of the character’s life—the moment of conversion appears as a kind of turning point, a point of discontinuity with the past, when self-motivated practices are rejected in favor of an exclusive reliance on the “Other power” of Amida. It is a

In: Critical Readings on Pure Land Buddhism in Japan

breath to be the root of life. 36 Therefore, Amida is, in verity, the life of all beings. Since the living beings of the world are endless, we call Amida “Endless Life.” 37 A particularly notable use of Kakuban’s idea of kimyō as life-breath is that made by the Danna-ryu cult of Genshi Kimyō

In: Critical Readings on Pure Land Buddhism in Japan
Author: W. Puck Brecher

recluse late in life, regarded the Laozi as the only “correct work” produced by China, noting “numerous points of agreement between Laozi and our own ancient thought.” 12 Mabuchi understood the Daoist Way as a social model that he envisioned as ascendant in ancient Japan. Daoist texts also articulated

In: Japan’s Private Spheres: Autonomy in Japanese History, 1600-1930
Author: W. Puck Brecher

the male masses into a top-down institutionalized modernization began with compulsory education, continued with military service, an advantageous marriage, and climaxed as family head and breadwinner. One might reject or recuse oneself from this institutionalized life course, and plenty did, but as we

In: Japan’s Private Spheres: Autonomy in Japanese History, 1600-1930
Author: W. Puck Brecher

wealthy merchant Sano Shōeki’s (1610–1691) chronicle in Nigiwaigusa (1682): To the northwest of the capital stands the mountain called Takagamine, the foot of which was given to Kōetsu. There I built a house and tea hut with the purpose of living a simple, secluded life. Particularly on mornings of the

In: Japan’s Private Spheres: Autonomy in Japanese History, 1600-1930
Author: Luis O. Gómez

the “inner logic” of the belief system. 6 This interpretation is in part motivated by a strong interest in communication across cultures—partly for professional reasons, partly for reasons of life experience. In the context of such experiences and explorations I have adopted a hypothesis about the

In: Critical Readings on Pure Land Buddhism in Japan

life and the earth’s ecology, it is difficult to make much sense of this kind of thinking…. Perhaps sophisticated Buddhists, following the lead of Shinran, understand that the Pure Land is not a real place at all, but basically a symbol for a different state of mind; but would such notion be attractive

In: Critical Readings on Pure Land Buddhism in Japan
Author: W. Puck Brecher

were successful only because bystanders reciprocated by granting invisibility. The private’s contextuality and contingency do not diminish its importance to an individual’s quality of life. Certainly, life without a time and place to call one’s own seems unimaginable, even inhuman. Whitman

In: Japan’s Private Spheres: Autonomy in Japanese History, 1600-1930
Author: Martin Repp

consideration that Buddhist studies and studies on religions in Japan tend to focus on doctrinal discourses or religious ‘ideas’ and thereby to neglect social, economic and political contexts. 2 As it is well known, a major step to elaborate the relationship between religious doctrines and economic life was

In: Critical Readings on Pure Land Buddhism in Japan
Author: Mark L. Blum

on Ming and Qing interpretations of mingfen 名文 meibun , a concept that stressed self-discipline, fidelity in one’s social relationships, and the fulfillment of duty and obligation based on one’s station in life. The underlying paradigm is that an individual’s considered choices, if exercised

In: Critical Readings on Pure Land Buddhism in Japan