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Author: Eva F. Nisa

love to expose and express who they are through their posts, while being digitally connected to like-minded peers. For the activists in this study, the use of Instagram for daʿwa is about establishing an identity as a young Muslim who wants to emphasize the goal of living a proper Islamic life. This

In: Asiascape: Digital Asia

land, which is a mechanism for owning it … and you know what the price of land is here! A rickshaw driver just deserves the right to accept, but not own the shelter, because priority for him is not living, not quality of life, it is money. Figure 8 Dhanas, ‘Rehabilitation Colony’ (left) seen from the

In: Asiascape: Digital Asia
Author: Annisa R. Beta

a proper Islamic life’ (ibid.: 74). In short, the Instagram daʾwa accounts motivate their followers to adopt virtuous habits and cultivate an ethical lifestyle, and, because of their popularity, they normalize the notion of hijrah amongst Muslim youth. They also inculcate daʾwa business

In: Asiascape: Digital Asia
Author: Ario Seto

encounters are not simply face-to-face meetings but a sign of readiness to make an effort to leave work or other life activities to spend more time with fellow netizens (see also Seto 2017: 81). These face-to-face meetings are a ritual initiation for becoming an acknowledged member of a group. The frequent

In: Asiascape: Digital Asia
Author: Leonie Schmidt

involved in terrorism/violence, and not every terrorist (someone engaging in politically motivated violent behaviour meant to inspire fear) is necessarily ‘radical’. In other words: a terrorist does not necessarily hold religiously ‘extreme’ views (Horgan & Taylor 2011: 174). Consequently, countering

In: Asiascape: Digital Asia

; Schmidt 2017; Shamsul 1999). Compared to their peers in much of the global North, a large part of Southeast Asia’s young middle class arguably has opted to live ‘the modern life’ religiously and often in ways more orthodox than their parents or grandparents would have done only one or two generations

In: Asiascape: Digital Asia
Author: Annika Pissin

statistical report does not provide information about how many of the approximately 122 million blog-users are women or children, rural or urban. Yet, I assume that most bloggers are urban, based on Yu’s observation in 2007 that ‘blogging became a way of living for urban Chinese’ (Yu 2007: 425), and the

In: Asiascape: Digital Asia
Author: Larissa Hjorth

. The most obvious group impacted by locative media and surveillance is women. As Katie Cincotta and Kate Ashford note, while geo-tagging might be fun, it can also leave a data trail of your life for criminals ( 2011 ). As they note, the history of gps as a military tool is important in thinking about

In: Asiascape: Digital Asia

distinctive features of this method, which Van Bremen draws from the insights of Yanagita Kunio – the founder of this approach in modern Japan – is the way in which ‘visiting outsiders can observe objectively a number of tangible matters in the life and milieu of a community. However, they are not privy to

In: Asiascape: Digital Asia
Author: Marina Svensson

’ includes people I know from initial offline contacts, a few I first met online and later in real life, and quite a few I have never met. Initially, I followed mainly media institutions, journalists, public intellectuals and Chinese colleagues, all of whom were early adopters of weibo. Later, I added a

In: Asiascape: Digital Asia