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Author: Jonathan Yogev

lands and ancient Israel shared a close native pantheon from which the concept of the Rephaim emerge. When a more absolute monotheistic approach motivated scribes to deny different aspects of the divinity of other beings, the Rephaim were included as well, as demonstrated in this chapter. Many clues in

In: The Rephaim
Author: Jonathan Yogev

” or “men” also appears in KTU 1.22, I , 6–7 as a part of the word-pair mtm // ǵzrm (“heroes”//”warriors”) regarding the Rpʾum . 32 The same word-pair is used to describe Dānʾilu in this fragment, and in other places too. The starting point of this study is to see the Rpʾum as living

In: The Rephaim
Author: Thomas E. Hunt

consequently it ‘offer[s] to the reader a possible way of being-in-the-world, a new way of living in the world.’ 7 Fundamentally, the Life of Hilarion asks the reader to emplot her own life into the general narrative of salvation encountered in scripture and in the Life itself. 8 Moments of ethical

In: Jerome of Stridon and the Ethics of Literary Production in Late Antiquity

Prolegomena ’s reception of Plato, the final section of this study culminates in a detailed analysis of the author’s hermeneutical strategies, beginning with its endorsement of the Iamblichean curriculum in divergence from other established reading orders, e.g. chronologies from the life of Socrates or

In: Brill’s Companion to the Reception of Plato in Antiquity
Author: I. Tzvi Abusch

1 The Basis of Mesopotamian Religiosity Mesopotamian religion is attested in written texts for the first three thousand years of recorded history. * All the same we would begin with a few words about the early Mesopotamian view of human life, the gods, and the city. It should be noted that

In: Essays on Babylonian and Biblical Literature and Religion
Author: I. Tzvi Abusch

derives from his rootedness in the temple. The connection between the god’s relation to temple and his relation to people is expressed first of all by the juxtaposition of temple and mankind: Lover of Ezida, preserver of life, Lone one of Emaḫtila, multiplier of living. The two are thus put on a

In: Essays on Babylonian and Biblical Literature and Religion
Author: Tzvi Abusch

religion. Therefore, in a Mesopotamian context, witchcraft refers not to magical behavior as such, but to inimical behavior, that is, to the practice of magic for antisocial and destructive purposes (though, as we shall note later, not all behavior so labeled was, in fact, motivated by evil intentions

In: Further Studies on Mesopotamian Witchcraft Beliefs and Literature
Author: Thomas E. Hunt

published in London in 1876 reimagines the life of Jovinian, a monk who was condemned by Jerome and others in the 390s. 12 It begins with a lengthy preface which claims that the book will illuminate ‘that mighty system of imposture which has exercised its baneful influence over a large portion of the human

In: Jerome of Stridon and the Ethics of Literary Production in Late Antiquity

philosophic practitioners. Ethics mattered; the example of Plato’s life mattered; and Plato’s voice (captured in the song of the swan at the outset of the de Platone ) also mattered. Therefore Apuleius’ voice also mattered. O’Brien here tackles the Didaskalikos of Alcinous, a text that has become, somewhat

In: Brill’s Companion to the Reception of Plato in Antiquity

Arcesilaus in exactly this respect. The decision not to write while living a philosophical life within the Academy, and the repetition of that decision by Carneades over a century later, is the fundamental reason for our dependence on secondary sources for the Hellenistic Academy. A comprehensive study of

In: Brill’s Companion to the Reception of Plato in Antiquity