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Author: Dirk Baltzly

pre-date the Ethics , it is not too difficult to see the Aristotelian idea of a telos or goal of living implicit in the Republic . 1 After all, the point of this work is to show that the truly just man is happier than the unjust man—even an unjust man who enjoys a good reputation—by inquiring

In: Eastern Christianity and Late Antique Philosophy
Author: Graeme Miles

Proclus’ own societal and philosophical context, Essay Twelve is effectively a philosophical pitch. For all that its details may seem abstruse and dry, it is, I believe, intended as a general presentation of a way of life which Proclus presents as superior to its competition, either the living of a non

In: Eastern Christianity and Late Antique Philosophy

transform readers to become godlike. Dorotheus’ reflections on monastic life provide metaphors to live by, by which insiders, in this case monks in Palestine, come to embody truths significant for their community in a process of self-transformation through the acquisition of theoretical knowledge and its

In: Eastern Christianity and Late Antique Philosophy
Author: Meaghan McEvoy

fall of Illus, Leontius and Pamprepius, would declare of the pagan in no favourable light that everyone living knew what sort of a man he was. 1 Pamprepius’ notoriety aside, his career offers a remarkable insight into the heights to which a pagan philosopher could still climb, thanks to the help of a

In: Eastern Christianity and Late Antique Philosophy

. The only other work of his that is directed to Theodosius  II is his De recta fide , and in that instance Cyril’s reason for doing so was unambiguous—to curry favor with the court in his worsening dispute with Nestorius. It is, therefore, logical to look for a similar motivating factor with respect

In: Eastern Christianity and Late Antique Philosophy

Maximus writes Ad Thalassium as an ascetic for ascetics, responding to the problems that assail a monk both in Scripture and his daily labors. Maximus’s monastic formation is the surest biographical fact about his early life and education. Reviewing this aspect of Maximus’s life will help

In: Divine Scripture and Human Emotion in Maximus the Confessor

source document, Kannaday posits that scribes performed a systematic reworking of the transmissional lines. However, Kannaday claims there was no such systematic work. Even if there is some credence to the claim concerning apologetically motivated scribal alterations, it was in no way systematic

In: History of the Pauline Corpus in Texts, Transmissions and Trajectories
Author: Sergey Minov

Since the very beginning of Christianity, the Bible formed a backbone of the new religion. The belief in a revealed Scripture, held by Christians, set in motion complex dynamics that affected the life and culture of Roman society on many levels, engendering what Guy Stroumsa has aptly called the

In: Memory and Identity in the Syriac Cave of Treasures

participation with himself and to have a share in his own goodness. 17 Following Clement and Origen, Dionysius relates philanthropia to Christ’s descent in the flesh. Dionysius is at pains to maintain Christ’s perfection during his earthly life, reminding that he remains “unmixed” while he dwells at the

In: Divine Scripture and Human Emotion in Maximus the Confessor

(to AD  300) has long been recognized as ‘wild,’ ‘uncontrolled,’ ‘unedited.’ ” 23 The wild development supposedly ended with a textual standardization motivated by ecclesiastical powers. As Parker explains, “the growth of influence of a number of key sees, particularly Antioch, Alexandria

In: History of the Pauline Corpus in Texts, Transmissions and Trajectories