Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 22 items for :

  • All: Living a Motivated Life x
  • Sociology & Anthropology x
Clear All

husband, who already has an apartment in Tel Aviv. Venerable Chaim B. from Wrocław is thinking about his daughter and son-in-law, who have been living near Haifa for 20 years. But I don’t know what a 70-year-old woman who has been living in a municipal poorhouse in Lublin or a 65-year-old disabled woman

In: Polish Jews in Israel

assimilate while living in Poland were most often connected to left-wing parties. From the mid-1950s onwards, Jews with liberal views were arriving in Israel from Poland, for whom the right-wing Cherut party had nothing to offer politically and was thus not an option. A further obstacle was ideology

In: Polish Jews in Israel

development of the kibbutz movement, sought “human reserves” among young, ideological people who were ready to accept the principles of communal life. 21 The status of a new oleh in the party made it impossible for people who had been leaders and activists of Hashomer Hatzair movement in the diaspora

In: Polish Jews in Israel

“internal emigration.” In 1967 people presenting these different stances found themselves in a similar position in Poland – they were all reproached for their Jewish origins and removed from public life, and those who had not been stigmatized receded from public life on their own. The anti

In: Polish Jews in Israel

leave that for another occasion. Although I made quite a few changes in my personal life, in my late 30s I viewed myself as dull. In an attempt to change this, I decided on a life motto, a guide for decisions in my life, which was “living, loving, and leading”. The motto made me strive for both inner

In: Intercultural Friendship: The Case of a Palestinian Bedouin and a Dutch Israeli Jew

1 Introduction The wave of change that washed through the kibbutzim over the past two decades impacted on economic, social, occupational, cultural, legal and other aspects of life of the kibbutz community. It also affected the people living in kibbutz communities – gemeinshaft commune

In: The Metamorphosis of the Kibbutz

usually share an ideology, an economic union, and a lifestyle, and view living communally as essential to their endeavor. Moreover, developmental communalism is also seen as a means to an end in itself providing social security and quality of life. Spitzer emphasizes that to retain its vitality an

In: The Metamorphosis of the Kibbutz

any longer a curious outsider, or a passive bystander, as I had perceived myself previously. Through the friendship I became an active participant in Palestinian – and particularly, in Bedouin – life and culture, assisting where I could. In fact, I now felt acquainted enough with this culture to make

In: Intercultural Friendship: The Case of a Palestinian Bedouin and a Dutch Israeli Jew

, and related to happiness (Demir, Ozdemir and Weitekamp 2007; Dunbar 2018 ; Garcia, Pereira and Corrêa de Macedo 2015). But living together in a multicultural society is far from easy. Difficulties in multicultural co-existence appear within the context of migration and acculturation processes (e

In: Intercultural Friendship: The Case of a Palestinian Bedouin and a Dutch Israeli Jew

1 Introduction The founders of the first kvutzot (small kibbutzim; singular: kvutzah ) migrated to Israel during the Second Aliyah (Jewish migration to the country) (1903–1917), motivated by Zionism, that aspired to the creation of a Jewish state on the Jewish ancestral territory. They

In: The Metamorphosis of the Kibbutz