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Author: Michael M. Shaw

. 18 The second way to understand unqualified generation is when the organized capacities for life, and the order of a formal substratum, become actualized as a material substratum. Such quickening of a σπέρμα constitutes unqualified generation as birth of a living substance from the privation, or not

In: Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy
Author: STEPHEN MENN

shows that it is a specification of, and an attempt to re- solve problems in, the Platonic and Aristotelian conception of the T£ÀOS" as a life according to virtue. Living 6ixo\oyov)xivo)$ T?7 4)�(reL is a spe- cial way of living 6IAoXoyovAevws,, consistently, as opposed to J1.l1xop

In: Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy
Author: Ronna Burger

through the eyes of the many we see the political life as motivated simply by the desire for honor. As for the third candidate, the theoretical life, Aristotle only promises to investigate it later. He passes, instead, to a consider- ation of "the money-making life," without clarifying whether it

In: Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy

activity [contemplation]. For, in the case of the gods, each of their lives is blessed; in the case of humankind, each life is blessed insofar as it has something similar to this activity. But none of the other living things is blessed, since none has a share in contemplation in any way. In fact the

In: Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy
Author: John J. Cleary

because its proximate goal is to promote justice, which comes under the notion of faring well with virtue. Such a general claim seems unobjectionable but also quite uninformative. The second account of eudaimonia in terms of a self-sufficient life involves not only the ethical and intellectual virtues but

In: Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy
Author: Jan Szaif

blessed life and is often applied specifically to the lives of gods, while eudaimonia denotes the condition of a life that “has a good δαίμων” and thus turns out exceedingly well . In philosophical debates, this term came to be used as a generic label for an excellent or optimal mode of living. As to

In: Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy
Author: John Bussanich

tradition of ancient philosophical ethics Plotinus has the dubious distinc- tion of claiming-in even stronger terms than, say, Socrates or Epicurus-that what is of greatest value is immune to the con- tingencies of life, and that with sufficient effort we can attain a state of divine invulnerability. This

In: Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy

-reflective beliefs of 387d-e. The underlying thought of 486a-b is not so much that human life is of no importance; it is rather that our highest priority should not be to maintaining continued human existence at all costs, but rather to living a life informed by a proper understanding of 'the permanent totality of

In: Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy

begin, then, with a brief analysis of banausia and the banausic worker. In the most general terms, banausoi is the label for people who earn their living by plying a "craft" that involves the use of the hands. The word "artisan" (used in the broadest sense) is thus a more accurate translation of

In: Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy
Author: Walter Englert

for suicide. Seneca remarks in Letter 58. 36 that one should not commit suicide to avoid pain, but only when the constant pain prevents one from living a worthwhile life.45 Thus when Seneca describes suicide in such instances as providing "freedom," he means that it pro- vides freedom from a

In: Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy