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drink and abounding in beds, and there was a dreadful and ill-smelling stench of frogs, dying and living and dead.5298ὑπὸ δὲ τούτων τῶν κακῶν ἐλαυνομένων τῶν ᾈγυπτίων τὸν Μωυσῆν ἐκέλευσεν ὁ βασιλεὺς οἴχεσθαι τοὺς Ἑβραίους λαβόντα, καὶ παραχρῆμα τοῦτ’ εἰπόντος ἠφάνιστο τῶν βατράχων τὸ πλῆθος καὶ ἥ τε γῆ

In: Flavius Josephus Online
Author: Eirene Visvardi

of pity. Foolish too is the man who bewails the near approach of Hades though he has no hope of life (484 ff.)’. Yet, it is Iphigenia’s pity that motivates a lengthy exchange which brings about the recognition and will save Orestes’ life. In the recognition scene, however, the siblings

In: Brill's Companion to Euripides (2 vols)

that covers the entrails (Lev. 3:3) is to be burnt upon the altar. Josephus here provides a connection between the dietary and sacrificial laws.6As Altshuler (1977:91) remarks, the one notable exclusion from Josephus’ list is the prohibition of flesh torn from living beasts (Exod. 22:31, Lev. 7:24, 17

In: Flavius Josephus Online

Δαυίδου μοίρας οὔτε κλῆρονWhile the leaders were saying these things to one another,1 a certain vile man who delighted in civil strife,2 Sabai,3 son of Bochori4 of the tribe of Benjamin,5 standing in the middle of the crowd, cried out in a loud voice:6 “None of us has a portion in David or an inheritance

In: Flavius Josephus Online

in [a situation of] such great poverty had not lacked for anything of what he needed, would be found to be thus vile and unholy17 towards him who had benefitted him that he would not only not save him from the wrong plotted against him by others, but would himself be solicitous to seek his [life

In: Flavius Josephus Online

of Mariamme, who was living in wedlock with the king.5 It was clear that he believed Alexandra was somebody blessed with beautiful children.626ἐκείνης δὲ εἰς λόγους ἐλθούσης αὐτῷ πείθει γραψαμένην ἀμφοτέρων εἰκόνας Ἀντωνίῳ διαπέμψασθαι· θεασαμένου γὰρ οὐδενὸς ἀτευκτήσειν ὧν ἀξιοῖ.When she had a word

In: Flavius Josephus Online
Author: Christoph Ulf

feasts for the living is a precondition, as Brian Hayden has convincingly argued. 14 In the 10th century BC , simple handmade ware as used in everyday life, but used as grave goods, symbolically signalled the former personal ability of the dead to give a communal feast. In the 9th century BC

In: Ancient Civilizations from Scythia to Siberia
Author: Mason, Steve

, καὶ ἀποθανεῖν δὲ κελεύσας ἅπαξ τῇ ἀδελφῇ Βερενίκῃ πολλὰ δεηθείσῃ τὴν σὴν σωτηρίαν ἐχαρίσατο;Although, as you say, I am a wretch,79 King Agrippa, who had granted80 your life to you when you had been sentenced by Vespasian to die,81 and who had presented [you] with so many goods82 —for what reason did

In: Flavius Josephus Online

view. On the one hand, Iphigenia is able to accomplish a heroic task and live. On the other hand, she is only able to access power in the public realm through the goddess and by living an isolated life. The play then raises the question of the compatibility of female power and sexuality. The details of

In: Brill's Companion to Euripides (2 vols)

exploits her former slave and has the attitude of a superior toward her unconvincing. 13 The slave-woman retains her old stance toward the former mistress (56–59), wishes to avoid blame (88) and claims that her own servile life is not important (89–90). This implies that the life of Andromache is more

In: Brill's Companion to Euripides (2 vols)