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Author: Shannon Godlove

West Saxon background living in Mainz, was commissioned by Lull and his colleague, Megingoz, the bishop of Würzburg, to write a vita of Boniface relatively soon after the saint’s death, most likely between 763 and 768. 5 In the Prologue, Willibald tells us that already Boniface’s fame was such

In: A Companion to Boniface

was written for posterity’s sake, the Jesuits’ derivative work was composed primarily with a devotional purpose in mind. To that end, the author gives his readers a chronological review of Margaret’s life and reign with an aim to direct them to imitate Margaret’s pious behaviors. The author weaves in

Open Access
In: Journal of Jesuit Studies
Author: Christa Irwin

of the region. What distinguished Barzana somewhat was his singular focus on the need to convert people the world over. The evangelization of the Andean populations was just one part of a global effort to Christianize all living people. Motivating this campaign was the widely held belief that a

Open Access
In: Journal of Jesuit Studies

spiritual director of Pondicherry’s four thousand Tamil Catholics (1744–51). In 1748, he also founded a Carmelite convent for Tamil girls as a testament to his commitment to the contemplative life—hardly a man, one would think, convinced by the idea that human fulfilment depends primarily on reason. As an

Open Access
In: Journal of Jesuit Studies
Author: Irene Fosi

German princes and nobles. His conversion was considered in Germany as a strategy for living his adventurous life comfortably in Rome. For the pope, who had initially criticized his adventures, he was later a necessary intermediary with the German world, a symbol used in the catholic propaganda. 2

In: Inquisition, Conversion, and Foreigners in Baroque Rome
Author: Paul Shore

of its chief beneficiaries. 11 Citizens demonstrating these virtues are not motivated by fear or hope of consequences in the next life. The distance from the values of the Ratio studiorum is striking, and the compatibility of such a benevolent state with the claims Kollár made for the

Open Access
In: Journal of Jesuit Studies
Author: Steven Watts

, and perhaps even Poland, in the same year – presumably in response to Pope Honorius iii ’s call in March 1221 for preachers to be sent to all the nations that bordered Christian Europe. 19 While the friars in England seem to have been better organised, and motivated by a somewhat different

In: A Companion to the English Dominican Province  
Author: Ceri Law

social order as one complete, neat package. This chapter seeks to interrogate and complicate this assumption, using Ascham himself as a case study and means to do so. There was probably no single institution that was more central or formative in the life of Roger Ascham than the University of Cambridge

In: Roger Ascham and His Sixteenth-Century World
Author: Daniel Cosacchi

July, 1979, Arrupe reflected on the general response to GC 32 and the reality of Jesuits living directly with the poor and oppressed of the world: “I would like to emphasize that the mere fact of being in a poor nation or region is not the same thing as actually going out and trying to share the life

Open Access
In: Journal of Jesuit Studies

motivated by the supposed thirst the Japanese had for the Christian message, cancelling out all references to Buddhism. A case in point is the translation of the first document in Chinese characters in Europe, advertised as the donation of a “church,” by the “Duke” of Yamaguchi. 14 The Japanese text

Open Access
In: Journal of Jesuit Studies