Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 59 items for :

  • All: Living a Motivated Life x
  • Social History x
Clear All
Author: Marion Pluskota

Catherine, St Nicolas parish, where her daughters worked as prostitutes. In 1761, La Couillaud was sentenced to a house of correction for six months after being denounced by her neighbours for living a debauched life and disturbing the peace in an apartment on rue du Bois-Tortu, St Nicolas parish, where she

In: Selling Sex in the City: A Global History of Prostitution, 1600s-2000s

brought in stricter control of brothels, even their closure, some of the early colonial administrators understood that the life of a professional courtesan in India was not the same as that of a sex worker in England; nor were sex workers here looked down upon by all other sections of society.” 10

In: Selling Sex in the City: A Global History of Prostitution, 1600s-2000s
Author: Pascale Absi

prostitutes and oversees their places of work. 22 Up until the early 2000s, life in the brothels was organized by a system of confinement. As in the previous century, the asiladas could not leave the brothel, move from one brothel to another, or move to another city without a pass issued by the police

In: Selling Sex in the City: A Global History of Prostitution, 1600s-2000s
Author: Nicole Keusch

everywhere. Rural areas do not have much to offer, so migrants, including women, seek out a better standard of living elsewhere. In some cases, women may hope to get rich, or at least earn easy or extra money so they can participate in the global consumer culture or take part in modern urban life. Such cases

In: Selling Sex in the City: A Global History of Prostitution, 1600s-2000s
Author: Mary Linehan

of arrested prostitutes. The cvc decried the prejudices which existed that limited the alternatives for earning a living and drove such women to prostitution. But when the great migration (1915–1930) increased the black population of Chicago to 6.9 per cent, whites were less sanguine about the

In: Selling Sex in the City: A Global History of Prostitution, 1600s-2000s

relevant for this chapter. The first is women who migrate, often as part of a large migration wave, and opt for sex work owing to difficulties in making a living in the destination country. An inability to speak the local language, lack of knowledge concerning the formal and informal rules in the

In: Selling Sex in the City: A Global History of Prostitution, 1600s-2000s

. The 1955 edition of the gse ties the definition of prostitution even more tightly to conditions of material need, defining it as “the sale of one’s body, usually by a woman, in order to make a living.” 21 It is interesting to note the inclusion of the qualifier “usually by a woman”, one of the

In: Selling Sex in the City: A Global History of Prostitution, 1600s-2000s

brothel as “the place where two or more women are living permanently or assembling temporarily for the purpose of prostitution.” According to Article 5, in order to open a brothel it was necessary to present a written request to the Governorate or the Provincial Administration at least fifteen days prior

In: Selling Sex in the City: A Global History of Prostitution, 1600s-2000s
Author: Shawna Herzog

the Johor Sultanate and used by the Temmenggong, the sultan’s military leadership, as a personal getaway from politically tumultuous court life. The island retreat would certainly have included a population of slaves to attend to both the domestic and sexual needs of its residents. 1 Until the

In: Selling Sex in the City: A Global History of Prostitution, 1600s-2000s

thorough, an even larger number was found to be below normal. Only a few of the women were considered to be imbecile or insane; in the great majority, the defects were too slight to entitle them to special care or treatment, although apparently serious enough to handicap them in their life and work. 16

In: Selling Sex in the City: A Global History of Prostitution, 1600s-2000s