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present God’s order in its most perfect form to the believer, an order to be imitated by the human life in its social dimensions. It was a sign of “cosmic, informed piety”. 4 Astronomical clocks thus served as a religious teaching tool similar to other artistic adornments of the church. Such devices also

In: The Astronomical Clock of Strasbourg Cathedral
Author: Yossi Almagor

stay at his estates, secured for him livings and positions, and, last but not least, promoted his career as biographer and historian. Birch and Yorke recognised that their correspondence, blended often with a healthy dose of irony, actually complemented their regular face-to-face conversations. 14

In: Erudition and the Republic of Letters

four had the face of an ox on the left side; they four also had the face of an eagle. […] Now as I beheld the living creatures, behold one wheel upon the earth by the living creatures with four faces. The appearance of the wheels and their work was like unto the colour of a beryl: and they four had one

In: The Astronomical Clock of Strasbourg Cathedral
Author: Ian Lawson

detail, noting that it was always intended to make discoveries and therefore already counted as a philosophical rather than practical mathematical instrument. The general argument fits, however: the metaphor of the natural world as a machine had the effect of motivating an engagement with the natural

In: Early Science and Medicine

and critic living in exile as a professor and librarian in Greifswald, was the first to argue so in a series of essays published as Die Gelehrtenwelt in 1799. It is a bombastic and eccentric work, in which Thorild casually compares himself to Socrates and Bacon, owing to his discovery that there can

In: Erudition and the Republic of Letters
Author: Máté Vince

1 Introduction Mark Pattison, Isaac Casaubon’s most influential 19 th -century biographer presents the London years of the scholar’s life as a period of decline, marked by bad decisions that resulted in his isolation. Casaubon left Paris in October 1610 as perhaps the most renowned

In: Erudition and the Republic of Letters

Strasbourg Academy in 1626–1629 to accompany the position of professor of history which he had had since 1613, had been living in Strasbourg since 1599. He was a friend of Kepler and translated Galileo Galilei’s text on the proportional compass in 1612 as well as his Dialogo into Latin in 1635. 26

In: The Astronomical Clock of Strasbourg Cathedral
Author: Thomas Roebuck

to rare documents. He also collected manuscripts, one of which is probably the Life of St John of Beverley by the eleventh-century monk, Folcard (d. after 1085), which is now in the British Library, a book that belonged to the Collegiate Church of St John at Beverley before passing to a William

In: Erudition and the Republic of Letters

interests of Savile and De Dominis were also intertwined in efforts to obtain for Carleton the fruits of the living of Langley, a few miles from Eton, in 1619 and 1620. 21 The activity of De Dominis for reunion with the Greek Church chimed strongly with the hopes of George Abbot (1562–1633), archbishop of

In: Erudition and the Republic of Letters

an additional quire with a twelve-page ‘Admonition on the caution with which one should read the writers of Chrysostom’s life and especially George [of Alexandria] and other recent biographers’. 1 Most copies lack this dissertation and have only a far sketchier discussion among the notes, ‘De

In: Erudition and the Republic of Letters