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, seem to dominate accounts of healing in medieval Japanese literature. 44 Shinmura has identified in the famous Tale of Genji ( Genji monogatari 源氏物語) a large array of supra-empirical beings who may cause illness: demons ( oni 鬼), evil spirits ( akuryō 惡靈), spirits of living persons ( ikiryō

In: Asian Medicine

and dosage her mother should take while warning them that “modern medicine has done a great job of prolonging life, but the legal system hasn’t caught up with the difficulties that inevitably arise when you have people living longer than they want to live” (188). This physician also insists on the

In: Global Healing

in some cases it does – than literature and literary criticism motivating a broad public audience, including medical professionals, to advocate for transformational change. As historian Sarah Lewis has recently asserted, “The work of culture alters our perceptions…. It connects us to the work of

In: Global Healing

for life, but at the same time is a living testimony to aids . She also asks her mother to “pray that God gives us the strength to bear the agony, anguish, shame, humiliation, isolation, and gossip” that accompany an hiv / aids diagnosis (26). 33 Stigma moves to the forefront of The Beast in the

In: Global Healing

characterizes Rayment’s interactions with Elizabeth Costello, a writer who is frustrated that she cannot extract a good story from Rayment and urges him to begin living a life “ worth putting in a book” (2005: 29). Costello also features prominently in Coetzee’s The Lives of Animals (1999) and Elizabeth

In: Global Healing

‘anatomoclinical’ medicine. Constellations of symptoms were linked to organic lesions that could be detected inside a living patient by tools, such as the stethoscope, pleximeter, microscope, and later X-rays. Rudolf Virchow extended visual pathology microscopically to the cell (he was nominated, but never

In: Attributing Excellence in Medicine

fairy tale. Here I was – a clinical doctor, a surgeon whose professional life was devoted primarily to taking care of patients – receiving the world’s most prestigious scientific prize. 2 These two quotes by surgeons, the first by Francis D. Moore and the second by Joseph Murray (Nobel laureate in

In: Attributing Excellence in Medicine

resources on managing also can actively impede the search for a cure, depriving individuals of any chance of a life free of their condition. 7 But what about healing, working for long-term wellbeing? Often just as important as managing a chronic condition is healing, not necessarily in the sense of curing

In: Global Healing