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to donate to friends and family members but financial incentives would be needed to motivate most people to donate to strangers. Evidence from Iran suggests otherwise, however: 81% of transplant patients chose a kidney vendor rather than choosing a living relative, thereby suggesting commercialism

In: Moral Conflicts of Organ Retrieval: A Case for Constructive Pluralism

contribute to heart disease later in life. 11 As populations get older and develop more health problems healthy living should be a continuous effort. Some authors consider primordial prevention as the preferred method to decrease heart problems and define it as “individual behavioral lifestyle

In: Moral Conflicts of Organ Retrieval: A Case for Constructive Pluralism

believes this question must account for individuals’ psychological traits. Hugo Tristram Engelhardt, for example, says that if we think that in living a life where we breathe, but not much else, and we believe that such a life is not worth living and that we would not be present, then we have taken a major

In: Moral Conflicts of Organ Retrieval: A Case for Constructive Pluralism

death, organ transplantation was the impetus behind expanding the definition of death to include the permanent cessation of brain function. The quest for organs motivates the recent push to change the definition of death to the higher-brain definition or to abandon the dead donor rule. Living donation

In: Moral Conflicts of Organ Retrieval: A Case for Constructive Pluralism

, but reflection shows that the moral life involves a plurality of values. A sense of peace differs from gourmet pleasures; emotional suffering differs from physical pain. Pain can be throbbing, piercing, or burning. As we will see, our list of intrinsic values and disvalues impacts the way we view

In: Moral Conflicts of Organ Retrieval: A Case for Constructive Pluralism
Author: Ian Lawson

detail, noting that it was always intended to make discoveries and therefore already counted as a philosophical rather than practical mathematical instrument. The general argument fits, however: the metaphor of the natural world as a machine had the effect of motivating an engagement with the natural

In: Early Science and Medicine

in a context of affective postcolonial nationalism; they also enable older, end-of-life patients to craft self-determined futures, in counterpoint to becoming “living cadavers” of biomedicine, vessels for adulterated foods and toxins, and isolated victims of kin migration. 9 This article brings

In: Asian Medicine
Author: Frances Garrett

Stories The fifteenth-century life story of the meditation master and poet Milarépa (Mi la ras pa, 1028–1111) reveals a life consumed by the search for adequate nourishment, with a steady concern for what he eats and how he obtains food. In his cave, Milarépa survives for a year on a single sack of

In: Asian Medicine
Author: Cameron Wybrow

302 Book Reviews / Early Science and Medicine 15 (2010) 287-317 © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2010 DOI: 10.1163/157338210X494012 Steven Matthews, eology and Science in the ought of Francis Bacon (Aldershot: Ashgate, 2008), pp. xiv+150pp., £55.00, ISBN 978 0 7546 6252 5. In a well

In: Early Science and Medicine

. Nevertheless, there were still many Ragusan recluses of a higher social status because the number of female monasteries was insufficient to meet the social or spiritual demands of the nobility. 36 Women may have been motivated to embrace this life for devotional reasons, but it was also recognised to provide

In: Tracing Hospital Boundaries