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Author: Hagit Shefer

noun either in combination with an adjective such as seder naxon (correct order) or in a genitive or possessive compound such as seder haxaim (lit. order of life=manner of living) as in (7b). The examples in (7) illustrate a host-class expansion (Himmelmann, 2004: 32) which takes place in the shift

In: Language Dynamics and Change
Author: Anne Storch

messy practice, namely by requesting the audience not only to reply to what has been said but also to evaluate how something has been said. This paper aims at exploring deliberate language change precisely as a form of daily-life creativity shared by entire communities, which is, however, also

In: Language Dynamics and Change

timescale of the life of the organism under study, and its interactions with its immediate environment. For Tinbergen, the distinction between ultimate causes and proximate causes in adaptation motivated an ethological approach that demonstrates how a given trait improves success in a given environment

In: Language Dynamics and Change

undoubtedly a product of our brains, their properties depend not only on how the brain works, but also on our way of life in a broad sense. Fortunately, ongoing research on paleo-geography, paleo-climatology, paleo-ecology, paleo-anthropology, and paleo-genetics is refining our view of the physical and the

In: Language Dynamics and Change

., & Mesoudi, A. (2015). If we are all cultural Darwinians what’s the fuss about? Clarifying recent disagreements in the field of cultural evolution. Biology & Philosophy , 30 (4), 481–503. Agha, A. (2003). The social life of cultural value. Language & Communication , 23 , 231

In: Language Dynamics and Change
Author: Cecil H. Brown

deer (e.g., Huastec, Ixil, Jacaltec, Otomi, Matlazinca, Chiapanec, Tequistlatec), a consequence of naming the introduced former creature after the native latter. My large-scale comparative investigation of names for introduced items (both artifacts and living things) in native languages spoken

In: Language Dynamics and Change

KSL to offer a definitive answer to this question. However, other research on emerging sign languages affords even more promising answers. Horton (in press) has begun to document the process of lexical conventionalization among deaf homesigners living in Guatemala. Whereas most research on

In: Language Dynamics and Change
Author: Jeffrey Heath

time again he discusses the life cycle of a construction with no reference to its functional (as opposed to formal) precursors. 2.2 The evolution of constructions The shift from parataxis to syntax is only the first step. Once a construction is born, it can be repurposed repeatedly, a process that

In: Language Dynamics and Change
Author: Chaya R. Nove

. The author does not disclose the source of the data and Hasidim are never explicitly mentioned, but references to a rebbe and religious life seem to imply that they are the ones utilizing such expressions. There are no analytic studies of spoken HY in this issue, either. To examine patterns in

In: Journal of Jewish Languages

Romance language spoken in everyday life by the Christians of southwestern France. During the next stage, the Gascon used by the Jews underwent a gradual “Judaicizing,” with new lexical elements introduced. Numerous words in this Jewish repertoire were taken from the liturgy. 5 Others were needed to

In: Journal of Jewish Languages