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Bolozky and Becker’s (2006) Living Lexicon of Hebrew Nouns ( LLHN ), a lexicon of 12,043 nouns (native and non-native) drawn the Even-Shoshan dictionary (2003). Syllables in monosyllabic words (5 %; n=587) were counted as word initial syllables. (1) Distribution of syllables in noun stems

In: Brill's Journal of Afroasiatic Languages and Linguistics
Author: Jean Lowenstamm

.lowenstamm@linguist.jussieu.fr Abstract Non-lexicalist theories assume a tight relationship between functional structure and exponence. A different view informs the analysis proposed in this paper. While the non-lexicalist view is endorsed, it is argued that morphemes have a life of their own and do not consistently and faithfully reflect

In: Brill's Journal of Afroasiatic Languages and Linguistics
Author: Chaya R. Nove

. The author does not disclose the source of the data and Hasidim are never explicitly mentioned, but references to a rebbe and religious life seem to imply that they are the ones utilizing such expressions. There are no analytic studies of spoken HY in this issue, either. To examine patterns in

In: Journal of Jewish Languages

Romance language spoken in everyday life by the Christians of southwestern France. During the next stage, the Gascon used by the Jews underwent a gradual “Judaicizing,” with new lexical elements introduced. Numerous words in this Jewish repertoire were taken from the liturgy. 5 Others were needed to

In: Journal of Jewish Languages
Author: Luca D’Anna

considering that it was not made during an interview, but in a theatre, where the informant was talking about her life in front of an audience comprising, for the most part, speakers of Tripoli Judeo-Arabic. Rāʔ /r/ In YJA, CA rāʔ is realized as a voiced alveolar trill [r] and does not feature the

In: Journal of Jewish Languages
Author: Steffen Krogh

’ Der id : der tog vos ikh hob nisht getrinken iz take geven der lengster tog in mayn lebn (B:58,2) ‘The day I did not drink was indeed the longest day of my life’ Der idisher gedank : […] a harts atake fun vos er hot zikh borekh hashem gants gikh erhoylt (37,1) ‘[…] a heart attack

In: Journal of Jewish Languages
Author: Evan Metzger

first name. In al-Udfuwī’s words, “I do not mention living individuals but rarely, and always for a reason: either due to a dearth of names for one letter, due to the individual’s having virtues or extraordinary charm, or due to the individual’s having bestowed upon me some kindness or good deed.” 9

Open Access
In: New Readings in Arabic Historiography from Late Medieval Egypt and Syria

seven years imprisoned at the castle of al-Karak. Karāy’s life prior to his rule in Damascus has only generated a few scattered references in the sources. However, when he rose to the office of the viceroy of Syria, he caught the attention of several contemporary authors, both inside and outside of

Open Access
In: New Readings in Arabic Historiography from Late Medieval Egypt and Syria

Gentile majority. Consequently, the Jewish authors in question were considering that they themselves were speaking German in their everyday life and not a separate language. 3 Early Christian scholars who studied Jewish languages (mainly within the frames of the Humanistic tradition) generally considered

In: Journal of Jewish Languages
Author: Kenneth Goudie

1 Introduction * When discussing the life of Burhān al-Dīn al-Biqāʿī (809–85/1406–80), a 15th-century Quran exegete and historian, modern scholarship has primarily focused on the three controversies in which he became embroiled and which defined the downward

Open Access
In: New Readings in Arabic Historiography from Late Medieval Egypt and Syria