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corresponds to living a life. The destination corresponds to the purpose or goal of life. The stages of the journey correspond to stages in life. The distance covered along the journey corresponds to the progress made in life. Path of the journey corresponds to ways of living. Obstacles along the way

In: Ten Lectures on Figurative Meaning-Making: The Role of Body and Context

? The second one: how and to what degree are idioms motivated in relation to two languages? How do different languages express idiomatic meanings? And four: how and to what degree do the cultural ideological backgrounds underlying particular languages play a role in the expression of idiomatic meanings

In: Ten Lectures on Figurative Meaning-Making: The Role of Body and Context

could have been used instead of “rebuilds his life”. So the question is: Is there any motivation for this particular metaphor? I would say yes. The reason is, we find out from the article, that’s why we have to look at the entire discourse to see what motivates a particular metaphorical use and why. It

In: Ten Lectures on Figurative Meaning-Making: The Role of Body and Context
Author: Prakash Mondal

and/or processes needs to be considered when speaking of minds just in the same way as not much over and above biological processes needs to be taken into account when talking about life. In this sense, minds are ways of speaking of certain entities and processes just like life is a way of speaking of

In: Natural Language and Possible Minds

representation: instead of saying LOVE IS A JOURNEY, LIFE IS A JOURNEY, A CAREER IS A JOURNEY, we simply say GOALS ARE DESTINATIONS, and that covers all the metaphorical mappings that are related to the idea of MOTION to a destination or a journey. There are two types of amalgams: single-source and double

In: Ten Lectures on Cognitive Modeling

to be very careful to briefly recapitulate some background material as it becomes needed throughout the lecture. I want to start by motivating a little bit the problem of cognitive aging. This is a figure from the United Nations. They give these data nation by nation, and this is just showing

In: Ten Lectures on the Representation of Events in Language, Perception, Memory, and Action Control
Author: Silvia Luraghi

reference or refer to social location, as defined in Luraghi (2003a: 66), such as agorêi ‘at the assembly’, trapézēi ‘at (one’s) table’, makhêi ‘in battle’: these are nouns that denote places or event in which social life takes place in the Homeric poems. In all these cases, prepositional phrases are

In: Experiential Verbs in Homeric Greek

could be regarded as distinct domains, e.g. ‘knowledge’, ‘seeing’, ‘finding’, ‘fear’, ‘confusion’ and ‘humour’. So what is common across languages behind these various expressions? At this point we need to ask a slightly different kind of question: What kinds of surprise are there in everyday life

In: Polysemy, Diachrony, and the Circle of Cognition
Author: Silvia Luraghi

the experiencer to actively achieve an emotional state. Most frequently, the stimulus is construed as a reason that motivates the emotional state. 8.1.1 NomDat Construction with Human Stimuli Emotion verbs that take the NomDat construction typically indicate negative

In: Experiential Verbs in Homeric Greek
Author: Prakash Mondal

properties. On the one hand, it can indeed be held that the process of life itself can be equated with cognition—that is, the process or the property of living constitutes what can be reckoned to be cognitive ( Maturana and Varela 1980; Thompson 2010 ). On this view, the formal and organizational properties

In: Natural Language and Possible Minds