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Author: Matthew Ingalls

Overlapping with several key historical junctures and ushering in the tenth Islamic century, Zakariyyā al-Anṣārī’s (d. 926/1520) life traces the dramatic decline of Mamlūk political integrity and concludes in the immediate aftermath of the Ottoman conquest of Egypt. It is Anṣārī’s dual role as a

In: Journal of Sufi Studies

-emasculation ( ista⁠ʾdhanahu fī l-khiṣāʾ ). 12 The above might strengthen the assumption that prior to the third/ninth century the term siyāḥa had been well perceived in Islamic societies as a description of an errant life in which celibacy and sexual abstinence were the basic pillars. However, a strict critical

In: Journal of Sufi Studies
Author: Side Emre

defijine meşreb as one’s innate nature, a way of being and living, an inclination towards a particular manner of speech, conduct, and behavior as well as a tendency to choose a path and stance vis-à-vis life. Each meşreb is comprised of idiosyncratic characteristics and gives the person a subjective

In: Journal of Sufi Studies
Author: Mohammed Rustom

window into the originality and complexity of ʿAyn al-Quḍāt’s life and thought, but have also rightfully been criticized for their careless handling of the primary source materials and idiosyncratic interpretations. 7 Without a doubt, one characteristic feature of much of the scholarship in contemporary

In: Journal of Sufi Studies
Author: Annabel Keeler

that after some time spent serving various spiritual masters in his youth, 21 Bāyazīd spent most of his life in Basṭām, surrounded by a number of close disciples; there is a discrepency in the sources about the number of his pilgrimages to Mecca. 22 Most of the material in these earlier sources

In: Journal of Sufi Studies
Author: Pieter Coppens

, compiled in the form of a tafsīr , is Ḥaqāʾiq al-tafsīr by Abū ʿAbd al-Raḥmān Muḥammad b. Al-Ḥusayn al-Sulamī al-Nīsabūrī (d. 412/1021), an avid student of ḥadīth who spent most of his life in Nishapur, the intellectual centre of that time, and famous for its tradition of tafsīr . 23 This work is

In: Journal of Sufi Studies
Author: Irit Back

them from visiting the tombs of other saints or consulting with the living ones. The call for exclusiveness was later accompanied by the requirement to visit the site of al-Tijani’s tomb in Fez. For some West African Tijanis, the ziyara (pilgrimage to a holy place, tomb or shrine) to al-Tijani’s tomb

In: Saintly Spheres and Islamic Landscapes
Author: Aiyub Palmer

5.1 Introduction Thus far, we have shown how al-Tirmidhī’s concept of sainthood did not appear out of a vacuum, nor was it on the fringe of the Islamic mystical tradition. Important social and political factors were at play in motivating al-Tirmidhī to propose a new approach to Islamic sainthood

In: Sainthood and Authority in Early Islam: Al-Ḥakīm al-Tirmidhī’s Theory of wilāya and the Reenvisioning of the Sunnī Caliphate
Author: Aiyub Palmer

the moral and spiritual welfare of his students as well as those who came to hear him lecture. One book that indicates this aspect of his life and teaching is Al-munājāt 93 , a series of prayers and supplications that express the dire helplessness of the servant who seeks God. 94 Also written

In: Sainthood and Authority in Early Islam: Al-Ḥakīm al-Tirmidhī’s Theory of wilāya and the Reenvisioning of the Sunnī Caliphate
Author: Omar Edaibat

scholars have attested to Ibn ʿArabī’s distinguished juristic training in this regard; 3 these credentials include his distinguished status as a ḥāfiẓ , an honorary title reserved by the masters of Hadith for the one who commits over 100,000 traditions to memory. 4 Be that as it may, while the life and

In: Journal of Sufi Studies