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Author: Oussama Arabi

and subtle which is yet very real in its effect: the result of an overture in communication between the present of a culture and its past, in a receptive stance of indebtedness of the living to the prized words and thoughts of those who gave them life. The action of the past in the present could be

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In: Arab Law Quarterly

's amals (living traditions of the prophet). He eloquently managed, though in a classical manner, to give a lucid and detailed account of Imam Malik's life, his environment, authenticity of the text ofAl Muwatta, its arrangements and reasons for compilation, and finally how amal is understood by Malik. Of

In: Yearbook of Islamic and Middle Eastern Law Online

most seri- ous crimes against life and property because of its evil purpose and adverse consequences. In most cases, this crime will lead to other crimes like homicide, to the extent that some bugh à h may kill close friends or fam- ily during the commission of their o ff ence. The punishment for this

In: Arab Law Quarterly
Author: David S. Powers

inheritance practices of the nomadic Arabs living in the Hijaz prior to the rise of Islam. This tribal society was patrilineal in its structure and patriarchal in its ethos; individual tribes were formed of adult males who traced their descent from a common ancestor through exclusively male links. The tribe

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In: Arab Law Quarterly
Author: Delphine Perrin

nomadic way of life, which partially explains the Tuareg mal-être . 7 Most Tuaregs are nowadays sedentary. A majority lives in towns, not only in such Saharan towns as Agadez in Niger or Gao in Mali, but also in towns situated closer to the centres of power in their respective states, Niamey and Bamako

In: Middle East Law and Governance

identity in everyday life? As I have already stated at the beginning, an Islamic state which can enforce shati'a through positive legislation is neither conceptually possible nor practically viable. In my view, Muslims do have a right to self-determination, including the right to de- fine and express their

In: Yearbook of Islamic and Middle Eastern Law Online
Author: Latife Reda

conditions in another. Safety, respect for human life and integrity, and decent working and living conditions are thus fundamental to human dignity. On the other hand, the fact that migrant workers mostly perform low-skilled jobs in a foreign country where they might not enjoy the same rights as national

In: Arab Law Quarterly

to elimi- nate the basis for misunderstanding which is in many cases a lack of communication. Of course, the same principles that may enable one to prevent disputes may also be of use in helping to resolve disputes when they arise. At present we are living in an era which prides itself on

In: Arab Law Quarterly
Author: Al-Harran

the Bumiputera entrepreneurs, others (the policy makers and corporate leaders) should realise that we are living in a world of rapid change due to technological advancement (such as the internet and information highways) and globalisation. If SMIEs (and Malaysia as a whole) want to survive in this

In: Arab Law Quarterly
Author: Omar Sirri

trip to Najaf to visit his family tomb. According to his memoir, Hamoudi spent roughly two years in Iraq after the invasion, hoping to build a career practicing and teaching law in Iraq. However, by the summer of 2005, the country’s challenging living conditions forced him to return to the us . He

In: Middle East Law and Governance