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Author: Francis X. Paz

Hakim Kassem (now living in East Berlin), Lutfi Al-Khouli (living in Paris), and Sonallah Ibrahim (only recently returned to Cairo from Moscow and East Berlin). The politically committed writers generally write about the exploited lives of peasants or life in prison, in a social- realistic manner

In: Journal of Arabic Literature

in this paper, was published by D � r Bayr � t and D � r S � dir in Beirut in 1959. 3 For an account of Mikhail Naimy's life, see his own autobiography, Mikh � ' � l Nu'ayma, Sab' � n ... Hik � yat 'Umr 1889-1959, 3 vols. (Beirut: D � r S � dir/D � r Bayr � t, 1959-1960). On his life in U.S.A. in

In: Journal of Arabic Literature
Author: Ian Campbell

]. Throughout his short life, Kanafani remained a powerful voice for armed struggle by Palestinians for Palestine in the face of Israeli occupation and Arab states' weakness and corruption. 54 Kanafani wrote Returning to Haifa during a period of Arab letters that prioritized a work's social function as well

In: Journal of Arabic Literature
Author: Jeries Khoury

events of Act Four, Pygmalion goes through a psychological con fl ict of a di ff erent kind. He has repentance for robbing Galatia’s life by his sel fi shness. On the other hand, he feels that the statue that remains of Galatia has lost its original indication, but it continues to remind him of the living

In: Arabica

, "A Handful of Dates", is related from the point of view of a young boy. The author recreates a critical moment of awakening in the life of a boy, born into an agrarian Muslim society. The root concept of the story evolves from the boy's painful exposure to the real basis of social relationships

In: Journal of Arabic Literature

throughout his life whenever he discussed al-Rabitah.5 What is important and proves its validity beyond doubt is that some sim- ilarities can be seen between the 1916 statement of purpose and that of 1920, which prove a continuity of thought and purpose between the two for- mations. In the 1916 statement of

In: Journal of Arabic Literature
Author: Saadi Simawe

history of women, as generally false primarily because it is motivated by sexual fantasies. Despite the poignant encounter between the great scholar, who spent his life research- ing the “history” of Shahrazad, he fails to see her reality. She chastises him for imagining a desir- able Shahrazad appealing

In: Journal of Arabic Literature

; civil war; trauma fi ction; war literature Both Khoury and Jābir are Lebanese writers living and working in Beirut. Khoury, however, is a more established novelist, journalist, political activist, 1 Th is study has developed from a paper presented at the workshop ‘Memory, Trauma and Identity in Visual

In: Journal of Arabic Literature
Author: Ronen Zeidel

” (Iraq) who ends up living in Israel. The writers are not so interested in the absorption and the life their Jewish hero had in Israel. The Jew is more of a symbol than a real person. He represents the purest form of Iraqi patriotism. Therefore, he cannot be at home away from his “homeland” and desires

In: Arabica

vols., Cairo 1927-1974; VIII, 250-251. All further references are to this edition, which is abbreviated to Agh. 2 Ahmad b. Abi Du'ad's account of how he saved Ab6 Dulaf's life would not be out of place in any statesman's memoirs. He is not only a witness to the events he relates, but an actor in

In: Journal of Arabic Literature