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-l-Dīn a general theory of ethics with the twofold aim to inspire people for this life and the next (al-Māwardī 2003, 3; cf. Donaldson 1953, 84–87; Fakhry 1991, 158–167; Arkoun 1973). Al-Māwardī notes that while improvement of the mundane conditions leads to happiness in this life, soundness in religion

Open Access
In: Journal of Islamic Ethics
Author: Yousef Casewit

maʿnā in the Essence and human apprehension is usually described in the Maqṣad as one that is absolute. Although knowledge of the meanings of the divine names is inferred from observing that this world necessitates a Creator who possesses essential attributes of life, knowledge, will, and power

Open Access
In: Journal of Islamic Ethics

fabric of the Islamic tradition, this essay is not descriptive, but aspirational in the sense that I seek to persuade readers of the desirability of specific understandings of the meaning of Shariʿah and the relationship between Islamic law and ethics. I am here motivated by two considerations. As a

Open Access
In: Journal of Islamic Ethics

main text; who the author was, what motivated the author to start his work, what form his writing would take, and how he would tackle the task he had set for himself in writing his work. In other words, such a foreword was traditionally intended to clarify four main questions: who, what, why, and how

In: Knowledge and Education in Classical Islam: Religious Learning between Continuity and Change (2 vols)

. 16 In Ancient Near Eastern Texts Pritchard translates the term ʾuḫryt as “further [life]”, 17 also the Akkadian phrase ana aḫrat ūmē 18 (lit. ‘in the back of days’, cf. Engl. idiom. ‘at the end of the day’) has been invoked as a cognate of the OT expression. Combining the material of

In: The Semantics of Qurʾanic Language: al-Āḫira
Author: Gregor Schoeler

) who no longer found satisfaction in the religion of their ancestors, rejected polytheism, promoted an ethical standard of living, and performed religious practices. Muhammad, who, according to Muslim tradition, was a polytheist in his youth, was apparently close to this religious movement prior to his

In: Knowledge and Education in Classical Islam: Religious Learning between Continuity and Change (2 vols)
Author: Bethany Somma

claim receives no support outside of Aristotle’s claim that nutrition is a necessary condition for life, and therefore a basic and unique capacity in living beings. Hayes alludes to nutrition as a source of motion, claiming that, “Nutrition as a source of movement essentially belongs to the other

In: Models of Desire in Graeco-Arabic Philosophy
Author: Aiyub Palmer

5.1 Introduction Thus far, we have shown how al-Tirmidhī’s concept of sainthood did not appear out of a vacuum, nor was it on the fringe of the Islamic mystical tradition. Important social and political factors were at play in motivating al-Tirmidhī to propose a new approach to Islamic sainthood

In: Sainthood and Authority in Early Islam: Al-Ḥakīm al-Tirmidhī’s Theory of wilāya and the Reenvisioning of the Sunnī Caliphate

alms. Thus, in these early stages of Islamic developments in education, the pursuit of learning was motivated by a moral imperative to fulfill one’s duties as a member of the Muslim faith, as opposed to merely learning for the sake of knowledge. 19 In studying developments in Islamic education, one

In: Knowledge and Education in Classical Islam: Religious Learning between Continuity and Change (2 vols)
Author: Aiyub Palmer

the moral and spiritual welfare of his students as well as those who came to hear him lecture. One book that indicates this aspect of his life and teaching is Al-munājāt 93 , a series of prayers and supplications that express the dire helplessness of the servant who seeks God. 94 Also written

In: Sainthood and Authority in Early Islam: Al-Ḥakīm al-Tirmidhī’s Theory of wilāya and the Reenvisioning of the Sunnī Caliphate