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Author: Juan Wu

, chariots and infantry, set out to destroy the Vṛji country. The people living in the Vṛji country turned to the Licchavis of Vaiśālī for aid, saying, “Good Sirs, King Ajātaśatru of Magadha, son of Vaidehī, having equipped a fourfold army [consisting of] elephants, 44 cavalry, chariots and infantry, comes

In: Indo-Iranian Journal

intellectual challenges to the Buddhist dharma , especially to the Buddhist view of the ascetic life as the highest religious aspiration and the only mode of life that can lead a person to final liberation from the phenomenal life of suffering.” 7 As a consequence, it is hardly surprising that the chapters

In: Indo-Iranian Journal

Meanwhile, the tenure of the office became very long, usually for life. Shāh Sulṭān-Ḥusayn (1694–1722) had a single Ṣadr who was his maternal uncle. 17 Table 1 Composition of the Ṣadrs under the important Ṣafavid Monarchs* a Of these, three were the members of the family of Naqīb Iṣfāhānī, and two, of the

In: Sociology of Shiʿite Islam
Author: Garnik Asatrian

referred to fecundity and fruitfulness of the earth and people. It was considered as a character- istic reflex of birth, a progressive quality of a living being and life in general, ver- sus taciturnity and silence symbolizing death and the end of life. Laughter was con- sidered even as a magical means for

In: Iran and the Caucasus

to become arhats, but was not seen as a quality that motivated the bodhisattva’s quest for awakening.” The author next turns his attentions to “Gautama’s Marvelous Qualities,” suggesting that descriptions of the Buddha would have enabled followers in a time after his death to visualize his

In: Indo-Iranian Journal

, whom I did not meet before, seeing that I was a foreigner, came to me explaining the meaning of the zurkhaneh . He told me that the zurkhaneh was an Islamic tradition, and that the essence was similar to the performance of prayers ( namaz ) and that living the life of a javanmard was the same as living

In: Iran and the Caucasus

strove for spiritual power and influence within the ethnically closed tribal structure. The motives behind that struggle and mutual ri- valry were principally of a purely mundane nature: having such power meant an access to the resources essential for living, first and foremost fertile land and water

In: Iran and the Caucasus

earlier. Indeed, there does not exist any unchangeable ethno-cultural standard. Living people are no mummies. But this is not the question. The question is, on the contrary, in recognising a given ethnic com- munity in a continuity of language, traditions, religion, basic values and worldview, and so on

In: Iran and the Caucasus

adhiṣṭhāna among the first and second “perfections of power” ( prabhāvasaṃpad ) of buddha s. The relevant passage makes quite clear that adhiṣṭhāna consists in a preserving power of an external object ( bāhyaviṣaya ), in the case of the first prabhāva , and of the very life ( āyus ) of its agent, the

In: Indo-Iranian Journal

who have lived a nomadic life, moving along the mountainous streams. Two factors, the terrain and the language set apart Talish from its neighbours. The densely vegetated mountainous Talish con- trasts the lowlands of Gil " n in the east and the dry steppe lands of Mugh " n in Azarb " i† " n (Aturp

In: Iran and the Caucasus