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1 Introduction 1 Sacred scriptures of all religions, including that of Islam, have a profound impact on the life of their adherers. For Muslims, the holy Qur’an has become a comprehensive guidance which does not only provide religious rituals but also other social aspects, including the

In: Al-Bayan: Journal of Qur'an and Hadith Studies
Author: Ali Hasannia

accept a multiplicity of views. At the same time, no individual or group was strong enough to suppress dissenting ideas and sects. Thus, the idea of tolerance in the West emerged from the element of intense religious beliefs and divisions in Europe, and the main motivating and originating context for the

In: Al-Bayan: Journal of Qur'an and Hadith Studies

. 16 In Ancient Near Eastern Texts Pritchard translates the term ʾuḫryt as “further [life]”, 17 also the Akkadian phrase ana aḫrat ūmē 18 (lit. ‘in the back of days’, cf. Engl. idiom. ‘at the end of the day’) has been invoked as a cognate of the OT expression. Combining the material of

In: The Semantics of Qurʾanic Language: al-Āḫira
Author: Hamza M. Zafer

mourner weep for the clan of Quṣayy, the poor and the wealthy, for all his sons are noble, the living and the dead, having sprung from the eggs of a hawk!” 29 For Abū Lahab, the honorability of ʿAbd al-Muṭṭalib and his sons was tethered entirely to their patrimony. They were honorable because they were

In: Ecumenical Community

vindicated the call of a man, Muḥammad b. ʿAbdullāh. Motivated by a reason, driven by a cause or inspired by a divine call he—the prophet to be—spoke on behalf of the divine in high literary form. He was eventually recognized as messenger and his message accumulated the kind of reverence and authority

In: The Semantics of Qurʾanic Language: al-Āḫira

predominant claim is that he has derived all he has said from the Gospels (which is, in itself, a polemically-motivated claim). Here we are in the presence of a kind of popular retelling of the story of Jesus, which may ultimately be derived from the Gospels but has begun to take on a life of its own

In: Intolerance, Polemics, and Debate in Antiquity

private sphere of the family and also liberated it from the contractual constraints that characterised the relation between the sophists and their pupils. Out in the open, in the public spaces of the city, his pedagogy offered the opportunity for a charismatic, life-long bond between a philosopher and his

In: Intolerance, Polemics, and Debate in Antiquity

rendering of the divine will actually and truly reflects the authentic will of God. 10 Although new religions tend to emerge fluidly and develop, adjust, and grow organically, responding to stimuli in a manner comparable to a living organism, at some point in their growth and development they

In: Intolerance, Polemics, and Debate in Antiquity
Author: Stefan Beyerle

whom it refers to as the “girdle wearers,” a sobriquet for Hellenists in Ptolemaic Egypt. 4 While the “Execration Texts” very concretely list Nubians, Asiatics, Libyans, or Egyptians (both living and deceased) as well as threatening forces in general, 5 the Apep (Apophis) myth only mirrors this

In: Intolerance, Polemics, and Debate in Antiquity

µὴν ὑπεραποθνῄσκειν γε µόνοι ἐθέλουσιν οἱ ἐρῶντες; 179b). Although absent from the Synoptic Gospels, this notion of a self-sacrificial death motivated by love also occurs in John’s Gospel, when Jesus tells his pupils: “No one has greater love than this, to lay down one’s life for one’s friends

In: Intolerance, Polemics, and Debate in Antiquity