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Author: Kees Versteegh

loanwords. Bosnia is a different matter. 51 For the numerous Muslim converts in this region interaction with speakers of Turkish came more natural than in other regions because, as Muslims, Bosnians were more likely to have frequent contacts with speakers of Turkish in daily life. From the beginning

In: Eurasian Studies

threat that motivated the creation of Köprülü 01589, as a way to conserve the city’s cultural resources in duplicate, and this situation could also explain why the manuscript left Shiraz early in its existence (on which, see below). 8 The manuscript is deserving of an exhaustive monographic study

In: Eurasian Studies

martyrs from the period 1155–1843, collected by H. Acharyan and H. Manandyan were published in Eĵmiačin in 1903 under the title New Armenian Martyrs ( Hayoc‘ nor vkanerэ ). 8 Alongside the higher style of rhetorical Life composed in medieval Armenia, a more popularizing sub-genre emerged, aiming to

In: New Approaches to Ilkhanid History

’s speech to enable her to kill the Tzar. This speech includes all the elements defining the terrorism of that time: I will forfeit my place as [a] county’s scribe and go to Saint Petersburg to kill Emperor Alexander ii . Living in the village is useless. We will be unable to do anything in it until a

In: Russian Philosophy in the Twenty-First Century
Author: Igor Kliamkin

and the anti-personal principles as well as between a pre-state culture and the state one. 4 Speaking in these terms, we can say that the militarization of everyday life is a way of existence of a culture in a split. Such organization of the state meant that, of the three basic factors

In: Russian Philosophy in the Twenty-First Century

.” In his notion of the “Overman” Friedrich Nietzsche merely provided a pathetically romanticized version of Hegel’s objective “spirit,” shrouding it in an obscure life will. It is Hegel’s being in a finite spirit, an immanent and permanent negative self-transcendence. In the twentieth century

In: Russian Philosophy in the Twenty-First Century

constant background of Alexandria’s everyday life. Many of the refugees who appear in the sources are connected with Palestine. In the Life of John the Almsgiver, one finds a mention to the bishop of Tiberias who took refuge there along with his family. 9 Additionally, John Moschos fled Alexandria

Open Access
In: Migration Histories of the Medieval Afroeurasian Transition Zone
Author: Myriam Wissa

Picharôt and the Arabic al-Bashrūd, both denoting a large area of wetland and marshes extending to the east of Rosetta where the Bashmūrites were living in their boats or among the reeds which covered the marshy banks, selling papyrus or fishing. 22 This wilderness provided natural protection from

Open Access
In: Migration Histories of the Medieval Afroeurasian Transition Zone

“solidarity networks” which “provide a setting for life at the destination, a basis for solidarity and mutual aid as well as for division and conflict” for the mobility of individuals. He emphasised, however, the potentially constraining effects of such networks through which “members of immigrant groups

Open Access
In: Migration Histories of the Medieval Afroeurasian Transition Zone
Author: Clemens Six

secular in order to see and understand, better than so far, the inter-connectedness of both at a conceptual level and in (past and present) daily life. However, these two scholars leave us in the dark as to where such vocabulary might come from, what it would look like, and which broader epistemic systems

In: The Transnationality of the Secular