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Hana Kubátová and Jan Láníček

, while the Jews are expelled from the city of Württenberg. In the original script of The Golden City , Harlan lets Anna’s father die, heartbroken by his daughter’s life in Prague. After a private showing, however, Joseph Goebbels disapproved of the fact that the innocent and not the guilty die

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Golda Akhiezer

Translator David B. Greenberg

introduced successfully to part of the academic world. 28 The figure who most stands out among the Karaite maskilim is Ilya (Elijah) Kazaz (1832–1912) of the Crimea. 29 His life, his character, and the radically different views that he held at various times are a case in point of the ideological trends

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Hana Kubátová and Jan Láníček

Jewish question was also presented as an opportunity for the majority society – a chance for a better life that, ironically, coincided with the denial of a future for others. 2 If the task of the press, radio and film was to mold public opinion in a way that limiting the position of the Jews in the

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Hana Kubátová and Jan Láníček

fateful to Marxism in their ideological views. In particular, Záviš Kalandra and Stanislav Budín (whose orginal name was Bencion Bať), both active in postwar political life until at least the Communist takeover, voiced a sharp criticism of Zionism and Zionists. 33 For Kalandra, antisemitism could be

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Enzo Traverso

Translator Bernard Gibbons

nearly 97 percent of the Jews of the Czarist Empire – the intellectual landscape was different, because of the existence of a living Yiddish culture and a vigorous Jewish workers’ movement. This was the historical background of a specific form of ‘Judeo-Marxism’, whose most significant expressions were

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Enzo Traverso

Translator Bernard Gibbons

million on the eve of the Second World War). Urbanisation – aided by a series of laws forbidding Jews from living in certain regions and in small villages – displaced the axis of community life from small- and medium-sized centres – shtetl originally meant village – to towns and cities. Overall, the