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“Autism and genetics: Profit, risk, and bare life.” Nadesan, whose earlier ( 2005 ) comprehensive sociocultural analysis of autism as a construct appeared to spark the wave of critical scholarship on autism that has been produced over the past 15 years, writes in this piece specifically of the social and

Open Access
In: Journal of Disability Studies in Education

the two can humankind hope to heal a ravaged Earth and ensure preservation of life. I selected this myth to analyze in detail for multiple reasons: First, it resides deep within my own cultural heritage, in-forming my own psyche as much as any other ancient tale. Second, this myth is central to the

In: Brill Research Perspectives in Popular Culture

-system of such relevant variables. The socio-behavioral sciences, the biological or life sciences, and the physical sciences have discovered or identified thousands of Independent Variables or IVs (a-i-r), as predictors relevant to explaining and predicting human individual behavior. But interdisciplinary

In: Determinants of Individual Prosociality and of Collective Social Solidarity- Cohesion
Author: Nicole Eilers

-Shevin, 1989 , p. 93). As Foucault (1983 ) explains, “we have to know the historical conditions that motivate our conceptualization. We need a historical awareness of our present circumstance” (p. 209). Specifically, the history of early childhood ‘inclusive’ education illustrates how race and social class

Open Access
In: Journal of Disability Studies in Education
Author: Michael Burawoy

resuscitated? Can we turn them into living theory? In this chapter I will suggest a way of doing this, what I call the ‘ethnographic approach’ to the teaching of theory that I contrast with the ‘survey approach’. There are two meanings to ‘living theory’, two ways to make theory live. On the one hand, one

In: Constructing Social Research Objects

gives an accurate picture of how most theory—both classical and more contemporary—has emerged in an ongoing dialogue with living or dead theorists. Neither is it very useful to persist with theory and concepts as a tribal language if we aim to encourage curiosity, creativity, and playfulness in how we

In: Constructing Social Research Objects
Author: John Scott

of interaction. It is the result of ongoing mutual constructions of the situation and of the attitudes and actions of its participants. It is the world of everyday life, the lifeworld of embodied living in particular locales. Knowledge of the everyday world is a sedimentation of our experiences, the

In: Constructing Social Research Objects

reserve army is not going to be employed by capital, foreign or domestic, so they call this segment the marginal mass living a precarious life. Note, there are racialised people with no skills under these same conditions also in the North (Wright, 1995 ). When the Communist Manifesto was written in

In: Constructing Social Research Objects
Author: Marcel Danesi

McLuhan called a secondary form of orality, which retrieves the primary orality of village life in virtual ways as if people were living in a tribal village, which he renamed the electronic global village. In tribal villages, the space between interlocutors was physically proximate. In the digital world

In: Brill Research Perspectives in Popular Culture

, which meant it ended up costing $19.00) and arranged to return a YMG fitness band, which wouldn’t recharge, to Amazon when I started thinking about the world of retail and the role it plays in my life and in the everyday lives of Americans. On Thanksgiving, the newspapers all had an enormous number of

In: Brill Research Perspectives in Popular Culture