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makes HCD flourish. In these various endeavours, Irani teases out the core values that motivate DevDesign’s ethos. First, the imperative to always “add value” is illustrated through daily life at DevDesign, where staff members are disciplined by the invocation to “choose,” as a result of their “free

In: Asian Journal of Social Science
Author: W. Puck Brecher

recluse late in life, regarded the Laozi as the only “correct work” produced by China, noting “numerous points of agreement between Laozi and our own ancient thought.” 12 Mabuchi understood the Daoist Way as a social model that he envisioned as ascendant in ancient Japan. Daoist texts also articulated

In: Japan’s Private Spheres: Autonomy in Japanese History, 1600-1930
Author: W. Puck Brecher

the male masses into a top-down institutionalized modernization began with compulsory education, continued with military service, an advantageous marriage, and climaxed as family head and breadwinner. One might reject or recuse oneself from this institutionalized life course, and plenty did, but as we

In: Japan’s Private Spheres: Autonomy in Japanese History, 1600-1930
Author: W. Puck Brecher

wealthy merchant Sano Shōeki’s (1610–1691) chronicle in Nigiwaigusa (1682): To the northwest of the capital stands the mountain called Takagamine, the foot of which was given to Kōetsu. There I built a house and tea hut with the purpose of living a simple, secluded life. Particularly on mornings of the

In: Japan’s Private Spheres: Autonomy in Japanese History, 1600-1930
Author: W. Puck Brecher

were successful only because bystanders reciprocated by granting invisibility. The private’s contextuality and contingency do not diminish its importance to an individual’s quality of life. Certainly, life without a time and place to call one’s own seems unimaginable, even inhuman. Whitman

In: Japan’s Private Spheres: Autonomy in Japanese History, 1600-1930
Author: Myat Thu

, but its religious institutions were also crucial for the life of the ancient Burmese. The head of the Sangha (a Pali word for monks), the Sasanabai, also assumed the official status of Minsaya, the immediate mentor of the king, who was required to comply with the ten Buddhist criteria of “good

In: Populism in Asian Democracies

’: Contestations in a Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme,” Journal of Peasant Studies 41, no. 2 (2014): 263–281. 32 Mookherjee, “The Other Side of Populism.” 33 All voters living in the ward-level electoral constituency are members of the Ward Sabha. In a state such as Odisha it comprises all voters of a

In: Populism in Asian Democracies
Author: W. Puck Brecher

introduced a previously unknown level of communal egalitarianism. The unifying potentials of egalitarian education could not immediately compensate for the ongoing disruptions to community life, however. Even for the former samurai and wealthier families that participated most actively in the new schools

In: Japan’s Private Spheres: Autonomy in Japanese History, 1600-1930
Author: Yunxiang Yan

number of young villagers have simply ignored the age-old custom of post-marital co-residence to establish their own nuclear families immediately after marriage. 3 Moreover, the stigma of living apart from one’s married son(s) has practically disappeared since a majority of the rural elderly who are

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In: European Journal of East Asian Studies

-11). The second of the aforementioned themes, continuity and the constant recycle of life, is embedded in virtually every contribution to this volume. The Chinese, for example, conceive of a homologous relationship between the worlds of the living and the dead, and events in one world have repercussions in

In: Asian Journal of Social Science