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1 Introduction The wave of change that washed through the kibbutzim over the past two decades impacted on economic, social, occupational, cultural, legal and other aspects of life of the kibbutz community. It also affected the people living in kibbutz communities – gemeinshaft commune

In: The Metamorphosis of the Kibbutz

usually share an ideology, an economic union, and a lifestyle, and view living communally as essential to their endeavor. Moreover, developmental communalism is also seen as a means to an end in itself providing social security and quality of life. Spitzer emphasizes that to retain its vitality an

In: The Metamorphosis of the Kibbutz

1 Introduction The founders of the first kvutzot (small kibbutzim; singular: kvutzah ) migrated to Israel during the Second Aliyah (Jewish migration to the country) (1903–1917), motivated by Zionism, that aspired to the creation of a Jewish state on the Jewish ancestral territory. They

In: The Metamorphosis of the Kibbutz

conditions of life accounting for the little room left for private calculations of purely economic interests in areas like choosing a workplace, pattern of housing, clothing, or a diet regime. Moreover, according to Abramitzky, there is also room here for income equality as a means of life insurance and

In: The Metamorphosis of the Kibbutz
Authors: Yechezkel Dar and Shlomo Getz

( Zeuli 2016 ). Only very few cooperatives are multi-functional organizations, collectively maintaining housing, economic production, consumption services, children’s education, and social and cultural life. Among them are the communes ( Kanter 1972 ) which uphold a life of sharing and equality in a

In: The Metamorphosis of the Kibbutz

. Individualism has become a strong orientation, alongside aspirations for economic prosperity and quality of personal and family life. Members now earn salaries, own their homes, and are able to make a living by working, whether inside or outside the kibbutz. These patterns define a community – once an ideal

In: The Metamorphosis of the Kibbutz

. 258). If I were to analyze my responses to the same surveys that Murphy uses to theorize about effective leadership and risk-taking, I would be caste as a person who generally avoid risks, is motivated by security and as such would be considered one of those ineffective leaders according to his

In: Critical Research Methodologies

faithfully carrying out the APAP policy. Specifically, officials are subject to at least two types of accountability systems. The first one is the well-known cadre evaluation system, which plays a key role in motivating local governments to do their utmost to implement the policy from the central

In: The China Nonprofit Review

conversation. I have two questions. The first one is for Mr. Liao. How would the concept of joy and harmony bring true happiness to the farmers? The second question is for Secretary Zheng. Why did Wuxi choose joy and harmony? Harmony Comes from a Joyous Life, and Joy Comes from Harmonious Living Liao

In: The China Nonprofit Review
Author: Yiyang Zhuang

dangerous disposition, so do the readers. As the “lads” perceive themselves, they are a cohesive group of authentic, mature, and “live-life-to-the-full” members who are quick-minded and humorous. These views are justifiable to some extent. For instance, through Joey, the leader of the “lads,” we can see how

In: The China Nonprofit Review