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assert that a lot of their peers were from poor backgrounds so the pocket money made an impression. For these boys, military service was their only escape route from a life of poverty and were thus very motivated to complete their training regime of three or four years and endured the harsh disciplining

In: Journal of African Military History

would not “let their independence slip.” 64 Tiv Second World War veterans, unwilling to return to an impoverished life as farmers and disillusioned by unfulfilled expectations for good urban jobs, played a key role in the emergence of the Tiv political movement during the late 1940s and 1950s. Their

In: Journal of African Military History

1 Introduction Unlike most British territories in Africa, Bechuanaland (today’s Botswana) did not have a permanent military during colonial times. Today, many people may incorrectly believe that since some Batswana served in British imperial forces during both world wars then

In: Journal of African Military History
Author: Elena Moore

because of that cycle we also decided to move. In contrast to his narrative as a younger man, decisions about where to locate his home, as a middle-aged man, were based around choices. He was motivated to move on as he wanted this phase in his life to be a time for developing new ways of living and re

In: The Individual in African History
Author: Lindie Koorts

Zimbabwe and Zambia under the control of his British South Africa Company. He also orchestrated a failed coup against the Transvaal in 1895. His personal life was equally fascinating, given that all indications are that he was homosexual, which raises interesting questions about gender and sexuality in the

In: The Individual in African History

-century ( Table 6.1 ). The Portuguese dominance of trade can at least partly be explained by local preferences for Portuguese exchange goods. Bahian merchants were particularly motivated to expand their presence in the region as they exported a certain kind of low grade tobacco soaked in cane spirit that was

In: Commercial Transitions and Abolition in West Africa 1630–1860

or its local representatives, giving them a powerful tool of coercion to control the large numbers of slaves living amongst free people ( McCaskie 2003 p. 97). Incorporation depended on many factors but was considerably easier for those who already spoke an Akan language and were accustomed to the

In: Commercial Transitions and Abolition in West Africa 1630–1860
Author: J. M. Svalastog

Charles ii – at a level unseen so far, certainly for the Africa trade – was motivated by the potential for gold, and likely also by pressure for support stemming from the inner circles of the royal family, with the king’s brother and cousin advocating for the company’s potential. The same tendency was

In: Mastering the Worst of Trades
Author: J. M. Svalastog

beyond the life or involvement of its initial members. Legal personhood opened for a company to both take legal action and bring people to court, and to be sued by others. A corporate body in perpetual succession could own land and hold capital. 11 As the merchants of specific trades banded together in

In: Mastering the Worst of Trades

(first secretary of the circle committee). For ten cells in the Sabão and Tongogara neighbourhoods where an estimate could be made for the number of plots (for living) they contain, the average is about 60 plots, where each plot is more or less square with a side of about 25 meters. In 2010 all of Sabão

In: Nationalism and Territoriality in Barue and Mozambique