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Volume-editor Elizabeth Millán Brusslan and Judith Norman

like vestigial organs, such ideas may become inflamed and life-threatening. 6 Cavell points to one reason for the exclusion of the early German Romantics from the Anglophone philosophical canon: the intimate relation that the romantics posited between poetry and philosophy, a relationship that

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John H. Smith

,” to enter into our finite “soul”? To answer this question he then immediately turns to “two miraculous languages” ( zwey wunderbare Sprachen ) that, in fact, can strike us with a powerful immediacy (“auf einmal ”) and overcome the gap between the finite and the infinite: one, “eternal, living

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Jean-Luc Solère

] is an efficient cause Far more powerful Than that which, as matter does, Passively receives impressed marks. Yet there precedes, To stir and move the powers of the mind, A passion in the living body, As when light strikes the eyes, Or a cry in the ears resounds. Then the mind’s power, excited, Calls

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Brian A. Kemple

human knowledge is not simply and directly an immediate perception of things as things, but rather that “object and objectivity are the very life and salvation of the intellect” 47 (object being said here in the original sense of the Latin obiectum as that which is present to a power and most

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Damaris Wilmers

Development Ḥajar, in his analysis of Ibn al-Wazīr’s theological thought, divides Ibn al-Wazīr’s life into three stages characterized as follows: a.) Growing up and studies; b.) Teaching, writing and debate; c.) Asceticism and isolation. Whereas he can limit the first stage roughly to the first 25

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Michael F. Cusato, o.f.m.

outside Assisi. This, according to Francis himself—even more than his vaunted embrace of total poverty—was the motivating impulse for his life of penance and for the penitential content of his preaching—indeed, for an understanding of the very foundations of the early Franciscan movement. Subsequently, a

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Meredith Ziebart

/explicatio and exitus/reditus motifs, 64 as well as the Augustinian ratio/intellectus distinction 65 —by way of which he is able to lay claim to the intelligibility of ultimate reality while preserving a sense of deus absconditus —further distances him from the basic presuppositions that motivated Ockham