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Author: Boris Hennig

for its eventual deterioration, but also a reason for the very need to absorb new matter and get rid of old matter. And this, after all, is what life is about. That is, if the constituents of their bodies would never reassert themselves, living beings would probably be radically different, if they

In: History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis
Author: Juhana Toivanen

’s argument is that bestiality simpliciter refers only to the empirical fact that one does not have anything to do with other people. It refers to a way of life. So, if one is bestial simpliciter —bestial without qualification, living in complete solitude—he is by definition not political. This much is

In: The Political Animal in Medieval Philosophy
Author: Vasilis Politis

contradistinction to knowing it. It can be shown, by a careful reading of 63e–68c, that the earlier epistemological claim is both about inquiry and about knowledge. Socrates starts (63e8–64a3) by stating that, as it seems to him, the person who has dedicated his life to philosophy may be well-disposed and hopeful

In: History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis
Author: Juhana Toivanen

life. 4 According to Aristotle, human perfection, good life, and happiness means a life-long activity of the rational part of the soul in accordance to virtue and, as is well-known, this can be reached in two ways: either by living an active life that is based on practical reason, or by living a

In: The Political Animal in Medieval Philosophy
Author: Giulio Sciacca

members have the potentiality to possess an intergenerational life cycle, and (iii) to have a minimal functional autonomy. “Living agents” is, according to Wilson, a homeostatic property cluster kind, whose cluster of property is quite broad, including among the others “having heterogeneous

In: History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis
Author: Guy Schuh

( thanaton epipherei hupoguia onta 18 ).” ( NE 1115a33–34). Now, it’s unclear whether the second phrase (“as many things as […]”) means that it’s an essential part of courage to be generally unafraid of present life-threatening dangers or whether it only means that it’s an essential part of courage to be

In: History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis
Author: Scott Aikin

that one ought not be a fraud; second, reasons why one ought not be a fraud; and third, what counts as a successful reason generally. 4 In the Discourses , Epictetus remarks on this division between levels of, on the one hand, mastering reasoning about living properly and, on the other hand, actually

In: History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis

end of the century colleges at Cambridge and Oxford were beginning to take in some paying undergraduates usually housed in buildings outside college. On the other hand, Gregory does a fine job in conveying the sense of daily life in a small medieval town, the tensions between townsmen and university

In: King’s Hall, Cambridge and the Fourteenth-Century Universities

end of the century colleges at Cambridge and Oxford were beginning to take in some paying undergraduates usually housed in buildings outside college. On the other hand, Gregory does a fine job in conveying the sense of daily life in a small medieval town, the tensions between townsmen and university

In: King’s Hall, Cambridge and the Fourteenth-Century Universities
Author: Máté Veres

into a position of ongoing intellectual inquiry instead. 50 Apelles, an unusally successful individual, a near-contemporary of Pyrrho who also served with Alexander the Great, is a remarkable stand-in for a position which claims not to disturb one’s project of living a relatively successful life. It

In: History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis