Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 78 items for :

  • All: Living a Motivated Life x
  • 19th & 20th Century Philosophy x
Clear All
Author: Jay Schulkin

the active sense of mind, and how it runs through the many faces of pragmatism. One view held by pragmatists was that the deepening of human experience was an important goal in life. But Holmes was glaringly flawed and limited. He was not a friend to those who needed one or a champion of civil

In: Contemporary Pragmatism
Author: John Capps

options that are living, forced, and momentous, is not. Whether an option is living depends on the believer, 5 but whether a belief is self-promoting depends on objective factors such as the content of the belief and the exact circumstances in which it is held. (In addition, while being “forced

In: Contemporary Pragmatism

argument was self-serving, it was because of this historical neglect to get William James right in the first place that motivated that essay . Nothing more, nothing less . Let me state it more specifically in a paragraph so there is no mistake and their limited span of attention to textual exegesis may

In: Contemporary Pragmatism

increasingly emphasize the category of ‘impact,’ defined as: ‘an effect on, change or benefit to the economy, society, culture, public policy or services, health, the environment or quality of life, beyond academia.’ 6 Academics in business schools also promote the practical concept. In a study of

In: Danish Yearbook of Philosophy

“meaningful” with alife worth living.” 56 Lear, Radical Hope , 7, my italics. 57 Markus Gabriel presents a forceful—and somewhat more sophisticated—argument for an analogous understanding of what he labels a “transcendental ontology.” The pivotal insight in Gabriel’s text is the thought “ that our thoughts

In: Danish Yearbook of Philosophy
Author: Paul Standish

imploring tone. In the next paragraph, however, Wittgenstein offers a response, and this is marked by an entirely different, quieter tone: #432. Every sign by itself seems dead. What gives it life?—In use it is alive . Is life breathed into it there?—Or is the use its life? In much of the

In: Danish Yearbook of Philosophy

it to be an essential and indispensable element in the vibrating whole of a living reality that comprises humanity, history, nation, state, and nature, uniting in each and every case, and without reduction, particularity and universality. The lectures explicitly address a very exclusive and

In: Danish Yearbook of Philosophy
Author: Asger Sørensen

university. 1 For some discussants, it has almost become a commonplace to denounce the idea of the university, recognizing as a fact that as a real-life organization, a university cannot claim any universal normative or conceptual justification. 2 In contrast, I will claim that the university ought

In: Danish Yearbook of Philosophy

those interested in living moral lives (11). Recovering Integrity thus continues Rosenbaum’s project, began in Pragmatism and the Reflective Life , to make pragmatist philosophy an appealing alternative to mainstream moral theory. Recovering Integrity advances two major arguments: one critical

In: Contemporary Pragmatism

* This work was supported by a grant from the Center for Ethics & Education. What ought I hope for? This question guides our pursuit of the good life and its answer is often shaped by our social, political, and educational experiences. We aren’t born with ready-made hopes; rather, we shape them

In: Contemporary Pragmatism