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those interested in living moral lives (11). Recovering Integrity thus continues Rosenbaum’s project, began in Pragmatism and the Reflective Life , to make pragmatist philosophy an appealing alternative to mainstream moral theory. Recovering Integrity advances two major arguments: one critical

In: Contemporary Pragmatism

* This work was supported by a grant from the Center for Ethics & Education. What ought I hope for? This question guides our pursuit of the good life and its answer is often shaped by our social, political, and educational experiences. We aren’t born with ready-made hopes; rather, we shape them

In: Contemporary Pragmatism

1 Introduction 1 When I do something intentionally, I am often, if not always, motivated by something: I have a motive for my action. This makes the notion of motivation an important part of our everyday understanding of others and ourselves. In the tradition of phenomenology, motivation and its

In: Phenomenology and Experience
Author: Jan Slaby

concepts to come to terms with it. 2 I want to revive this perspective in a transformed guise, for the purpose of motivating and informing a critical phenomenology of affectivity. Heidegger glossed the dimension of affectivity as Befindlichkeit —this is on the one hand related to a term from colloquial

In: Phenomenology as Performative Exercise

softwares, 21 smart technologies and A.I., etc. are embedded in our living experience, so that we can certainly separate and distinguish them from bare, organic life, but the distinction itself becomes more and more theoretical, since most of our actions nowadays imply the cooperation and integration of

In: Phenomenology as Performative Exercise

quite momentous. It is important and unique and I may never be able to choose to make this decision at any other time in my life. If a decision is intellectually undecidable and a genuine option (living, forced, and momentous) James tells us we are permitted (epistemically and morally) to side with our

In: Contemporary Pragmatism

generic sense, designating the process of carrying out certain orientations in our way of life. There are multiple types of enactment in this generic sense, both current and habitual. 25 But these enactments are invariably embedded in a manner of living in a life-world constituted by the surrounding

In: Phenomenology as Performative Exercise
Author: Jason Hannan

more intelligent public policies. Sen offers the example of certain cultural constraints upon women in India, constraints that have been a considerable disadvantage in the pursuit of living a meaningful and fulfilling life. The third feature of the capabilities approach is the reliance upon social

In: Contemporary Pragmatism
Author: Naoko Saito

I Democracy as a Way of Life and Political Realism [Democracy] is an ideal in the only intelligible sense of an ideal: namely, the tendency and movement of some thing which exists carried to its final limit, viewed as completed, perfected … The idea of ideal of a community presents

In: Contemporary Pragmatism

accepted and what would its role be?; Should the plurality of norms and values be respected in the public sphere?, if the answer is YES, how can this plurality of axiological systems be legitimately regulated, if the concept of a ‘good life’ for different members of a society may be too vast. 2

In: Contemporary Pragmatism