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1 Introduction 1 When I do something intentionally, I am often, if not always, motivated by something: I have a motive for my action. This makes the notion of motivation an important part of our everyday understanding of others and ourselves. In the tradition of phenomenology, motivation and its

In: Phenomenology and Experience
Author: Jan Slaby

concepts to come to terms with it. 2 I want to revive this perspective in a transformed guise, for the purpose of motivating and informing a critical phenomenology of affectivity. Heidegger glossed the dimension of affectivity as Befindlichkeit —this is on the one hand related to a term from colloquial

In: Phenomenology as Performative Exercise

softwares, 21 smart technologies and A.I., etc. are embedded in our living experience, so that we can certainly separate and distinguish them from bare, organic life, but the distinction itself becomes more and more theoretical, since most of our actions nowadays imply the cooperation and integration of

In: Phenomenology as Performative Exercise

generic sense, designating the process of carrying out certain orientations in our way of life. There are multiple types of enactment in this generic sense, both current and habitual. 25 But these enactments are invariably embedded in a manner of living in a life-world constituted by the surrounding

In: Phenomenology as Performative Exercise
Author: Maren Wehrle

ways of moving and behaving: acquired habits and skills allow us to quickly orientate, optimize and facilitate our daily life, while bodily movement, expression and interaction also create a playful and enjoyable relation to the world. This relation, the performances of the body , so I want to argue

In: Phenomenology as Performative Exercise
Author: Susan Kozel

understand life, more precisely, in looking to dancing bodies we understand mediated bodies. The archiving processes experienced by users of mobile and networked media on a daily basis take the form of personal data and actions being recorded, stored, archived and subject to a wide range of analytic and

In: Phenomenology as Performative Exercise
Author: Sophie Loidolt

1 The Relation between Experience and Normativity The relation between experience and normativity is often conceived as a hierarchical one. In practical life, norms and normative principles are supposed to enable us to evaluate the experiences we have, thereby leading us to actions that are

In: Phenomenology and Experience
Author: Iris Laner

consider herself a phenomenologist, her considerations of contending bodies show an affinity with such theories in crediting the importance of the living body, its situation and experience. However, she sticks with the firm belief that it is necessary to go beyond a first-person-centered approach 2 in

In: Phenomenology as Performative Exercise

one’s experience as referring to an objective world and involving a claim to truth. Using a well-known distinction in ordinary German, which has had some significant philosophical consequences, we could refer to the former as Erlebnis , a (mere) experiencing as living, and to the latter as Erfahrung

In: Phenomenology and Experience
Author: Lucilla Guidi

observed, phenomenology reenacts certain motifs and attitudes of the ancient conception of philosophy as a way of life, 2 since it embodies an exercise and a work on oneself. Therefore, it “is not a theoretical construct, but a method for training people to live and look at the world in a new way.” 3 It

In: Phenomenology as Performative Exercise