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Author: Sandra Lehmann

is, on the death of the alleged human God-King and the resurrection of the Living One, it reveals a life beyond life unto death. That is, it reveals a life irreducible and unconditioned, a radically free life. The question is to what extent the postmodern present can connect to such a life without

In: Journal for Continental Philosophy of Religion

Husserlians (trained to see “things” more precisely): one may very well say that it is through the very fact of me living that I first get a hold on things, the fact remains that it is hard to see how one “arrives at some level of objectivity” when one “associates life with interiority and, the world with

In: Journal for Continental Philosophy of Religion
Author: Bret W. Davis

in the poet’s accompanying comment regarding “the ancient tale about the man who used a skull for a pillow and ended up unable to distinguish dream from reality—that, too, tells us something about life.” 16 Which is dream and which is reality, dead matter or living experience, the skull or the

In: Research in Phenomenology
Author: Jason M. Wirth

, Nishida’s colleague and philosophical rival, adapted this to Shinran’s True Pure Land practice: “No one can live a genuine life except through death. Living in death, acting as one who has died, becomes the way to true life.” 10 The Great Death does not collapse philosophy, but rather expands it. One

In: Research in Phenomenology
Author: Kelly Oliver

a pack of wolves ripping into the alpha-dog. What distinguishes them from wolves, however, is that they subsequently idealize their “prey,” the superior father, to the point that “[t]he dead father became stronger than the living one had been.” 6 Thus, they not only assimilate his power and

In: Journal for Continental Philosophy of Religion
Author: Jan Slaby

concepts to come to terms with it. 2 I want to revive this perspective in a transformed guise, for the purpose of motivating and informing a critical phenomenology of affectivity. Heidegger glossed the dimension of affectivity as Befindlichkeit —this is on the one hand related to a term from colloquial

In: Phenomenology as Performative Exercise

softwares, 21 smart technologies and A.I., etc. are embedded in our living experience, so that we can certainly separate and distinguish them from bare, organic life, but the distinction itself becomes more and more theoretical, since most of our actions nowadays imply the cooperation and integration of

In: Phenomenology as Performative Exercise

generic sense, designating the process of carrying out certain orientations in our way of life. There are multiple types of enactment in this generic sense, both current and habitual. 25 But these enactments are invariably embedded in a manner of living in a life-world constituted by the surrounding

In: Phenomenology as Performative Exercise
Author: Maren Wehrle

ways of moving and behaving: acquired habits and skills allow us to quickly orientate, optimize and facilitate our daily life, while bodily movement, expression and interaction also create a playful and enjoyable relation to the world. This relation, the performances of the body , so I want to argue

In: Phenomenology as Performative Exercise
Author: Susan Kozel

understand life, more precisely, in looking to dancing bodies we understand mediated bodies. The archiving processes experienced by users of mobile and networked media on a daily basis take the form of personal data and actions being recorded, stored, archived and subject to a wide range of analytic and

In: Phenomenology as Performative Exercise