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Author: Samir Gandesha

-preservation is itself undertaken becomes without substance, that is, lifeless. Life, therefore, becomes a living death. The aggression accumulated historically under the aegis of the civilizing process reaches a level at which it explodes in a murderous rage against the very representatives of that civilization

In: Perfektionismus der Autonomie

dynamics of organic life. In conceiving perfecting as the mere unfolding of the forces or capacities intrinsic to a living being through its own (self-)activity, Garve deprives the concept of any normative dimension. It is not based in pure practical reason but is simply the evolving manifestation of a

In: Perfektionismus der Autonomie
Author: Dean Moyar

? On this second issue there is no strict either-or, for it makes sense for self-perfection to be a vehicle for the perfection of the world. Yet there are significantly different ways of thinking about the moral life depending on whether self-cultivation or the production of ethical outcomes is primary

In: Perfektionismus der Autonomie
Author: Mark P. Worrell

.) on “partialization” as both fetishism and a creativity. Durkheim and Menninger demonstrate that the concepts of life and death are polar oppositions and that the Hegelian and Marxist concerns for the “living dead” or the “undead” (Žižek) are highly relevant for contemporary society. Are we fully

In: Disintegration: Bad Love, Collective Suicide, and the Idols of Imperial Twilight
Author: Mark P. Worrell

1967 : 145). The romantic, then, in their longing for the sublime is engaged in a suicidal calling; the disenchanted life is not worth living ( Binion 2005 : 67). Pushed to the extreme, the altruistic fanatic reveals their narcissism, an extreme form of egoism; the two moments form a speculative

In: Disintegration: Bad Love, Collective Suicide, and the Idols of Imperial Twilight

Church, its social welfare work and the diversity of religious life. Cultural hermeneutics depends on external factors and stimuli from the world of living culture, yet in theologies we find massive resistance to heeding this fact. Academic theology serves the Church only by being a function of

In: Doing Humanities in Nineteenth-Century Germany