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Author: David Rothstein

wicked, for even if he is an Israelite and a wicked person your God abhors his sacrifice! And, furthermore, as for that which you adduce from other places [in scripture], answer me on the basis of the Torah!” Said to him R. Jose: “By your life, there is an explicit verse. For, thus you find that when the

In: Biblische Zeitschrift
Author: Samantha Joo

their questions but does not engage them. Unlike the jocular man who is always surrounded by people, he leads a very solitary life, sleeping in front of the TV by himself. But he is not alone for a lack of female companionship; women openly express their attraction for him. Yet he, a heterosexual man

In: Biblical Interpretation

children by taking into account the violence and death of real children in contemporary living memory. This intertextual perspective certainly goes beyond biblical criticism’s traditional focus on sources and influences, but a thick description of a text may productively embrace a combination of both

In: Biblical Interpretation
Author: Saul M. Olyan

a day of rest motivates the observance of the Sabbath as well as the apparent shared rank of working animals, slaves, and resident alien laborers. In contrast to the preceding law, in which poor Israelites are privileged over wild herbivores with respect to access to fallow lands in the seventh year

In: Biblical Interpretation

rave reviews: Cynthia Ozick, for instance, called the novel “glorious” and “powerful in its living imagery, passion, and humanity.” 4 The Prophet’s Wife is notable not only because it is the final, unfinished project of a beloved Jewish writer, but also because it is an imaginative reinterpretation

In: Biblical Interpretation

inherit eternal life?” (10:25), a question that does not have a clear answer in the Torah and therefore seeks to expose Jesus’s distinctive legal hermeneutics. 75 In the story of the rich ruler in Luke 18:18-30 (and its parallels), Jesus in his role as teacher is asked the very same question and responds

In: Biblical Interpretation
Author: Judith V. Stack

adjective tsaddiq plays a decisive role in designating those who lead a properly religious life. Being righteous is not viewed as the gift of God. Rather the righteous are those who practice the commandments. This is not to say that God does not give any help to the righteous…. This help however, is not

In: Metaphor and the Portrayal of the Cause(s) of Sin and Evil in the Gospel of Matthew
Author: Judith V. Stack

meaning of חטא is “to miss [the mark]” and thus is etymologically analogous to ἁµαρτ- and also metaphorical when used in an ethical or religious sense. Quell in his TDNT article on the OT background of ἁµαρτάνω is confident that, for those who employed חטא , the metaphor was indeed a living one: “The

In: Metaphor and the Portrayal of the Cause(s) of Sin and Evil in the Gospel of Matthew
Author: Judith V. Stack

eventually controlled or motivated by evil spiritual forces. That this is a concern is evident in Jesus injunction after finding his disciples asleep in the Garden of Gethsemane: “Be alert and pray lest you enter into temptation; the spirit is willing but the flesh is feeble.” 1 Although Jesus does not

In: Metaphor and the Portrayal of the Cause(s) of Sin and Evil in the Gospel of Matthew
Author: Kevin Burrell

intervention not because of racial bias, but rather because of a theological imperative: the biblical writer is theologically motivated to demonstrate the superior power of Yahweh above human military strength. Thus, the interpretation of Isaiah 18:1–7 and related passages outlined below demonstrates two

In: Cushites in the Hebrew Bible