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Author: Markus Mühling

consciousness in order to determine if they are acts of faith: they are faith – as life-forms or wayformational perspectives, which cannot be separated into inner and outer. Faith is spiritual, but not mental. Rather, faith is bodily. Faith finds its concentration in trust, but trust is also not simply a

In: Post-Systematic Theology I
Author: Markus Mühling

is pre-reflexive and undivided. Only after a reflection, presupposing the certainty of one’s own living body, can one conceive of it as the entanglement of the movements of the perceiver and the perceived. About movement, however, the following statement is true: ‘the moving object or rather, as we

In: Post-Systematic Theology I
Author: Markus Mühling

.1 The Living Body in its Meaning for Reason Reason is primarily practical and epistemic reason, unmixed and unseparated, and only secondarily technical reason. Some of its features seem to follow a chiastic logic: On the one hand, reason is bound to bodily perceiving truth and value on particular

In: Post-Systematic Theology I
Author: Markus Mühling

conventionalist understanding of habit as the core of the concept of causality. In naming belief a habit we find a classification without any specific differences that motivates the search for the distinction between belief and other habits and conventions. 37 Belief, including belief in causality, has the

In: Post-Systematic Theology I
Author: Markus Mühling

probably historical; think of the relationship between male and female, or the understanding of the state in the Pastoral epistles; think of the rejection of the natural family in Jesus’s proclamation, etc. 4. That it is only the rejection of the OT as canonical is not motivated by a central intention

In: Post-Systematic Theology I
Author: Markus Mühling

narrantic level by asking what in the life story of a particular human person is necessary and what is contingent. Without any question, our own life story, like that of other humans, is a combination of templates or narratives. But of course, it would be degrading to claim that the life story of a person

In: Post-Systematic Theology I
Author: Karl Hefty

Henry means that apart from Life and, in a deeper sense, apart from God’s own life given in Christ, human living dis-integrates, and lacks unity or consistency, then Henry’s claim is impeccably, phenomenologically and theologically precise. Neither here nor elsewhere does Henry turn finite flesh into a

In: Journal for Continental Philosophy of Religion

and motivating them to creative action. The Jewish philosopher, by contrast, exalted a contemplative ideal. Inspired by Hellenic intellectualism, Jewish philosophers, according to Kaplan, sought the highest good in thought, not in deeds. This lack of concern for the daily problems of Jewish living

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy
Author: Sandra Lehmann

. This is so because by orienting itself on the Christ event, that is, on the death of the alleged human God-King and the resurrection of the Living One, it reveals a life beyond life unto death. That is, it reveals a life irreducible and unconditioned, a radically free life. The question is to what

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In: Journal for Continental Philosophy of Religion
Author: David Janssens

account; and whoever understands it, under- stands that a life which does not account for itself is not worth living for man. Thus, Socrates gives an answer to the question regarding the right way of life: raising the question regarding the right way of life - this alone is the right way of life·" (CAM

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy