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to Beauvoir on October 5, 1939 emphasizing their merged relationship: “Oh yes, my dear love, you are living my life for me, make no mistake about it.” 48 Beauvoir agrees, as in this October 8, 1939 letter, but with a reciprocity missing from his letters: “My love, we are only one—and I feel that I

In: Simone de Beauvoir Studies

string of words with the whole of things, with a concrete, singular, living being. 14 Giacometti knew this lesson well. After the war, Giacometti devoted his art to the project of sculpting the human face. 15 As Beauvoir explains in The Prime of Life , “A face, [Giacometti] told us, is an indivisible

In: Simone de Beauvoir Studies
Author: Meryl Altman

work and good life (still can). But as Germaine Brée hinted, there are risks involved in a single-figure professional society. There is the danger of becoming a fan club, almost a cult. There is a danger of hagiography (which would be embarrassing) and a danger of antiquarianism (which would be dull

In: Simone de Beauvoir Studies
Author: Michael Ure

, after the rupture with Lou, entered into a definitive solitude, strolled at night in the mountains which overlook the Gulf of Genoa, and lighted immense fires, which he watched burned. I have often thought of these fires and their glow has danced behind all my intellectual life. If I have even been

In: Brill's Companion to Camus

Zelda Fitzgerald, were financially and morally supported, all were hospitably welcomed, many lodged, entertained, and fed. Looking back on her parents’ privileged life, Honoria points out that it wasn’t social distinction that had motivated them. ‘It wasn’t a clique, it wasn’t a coterie’, her father

In: Women Writing on the French Riviera
Author: Simon Lea

absolutely affirmed (R 64–65, OC III 122–123). However, a decade and half earlier Camus, still working through Nietzsche’s ideas, finds a much more positive view of amor fati , eternal recurrence, and the übermensch . 2 Nietzsche was a constant presence in Camus’s life and his attempts to consider and

In: Brill's Companion to Camus

follow that a human life in particular is not worth living. It is not about the meaning of life but about a meaningful life . Camus thinks abstractly when he writes that “the fundamental subject” of The Myth of Sisyphus is “whether life has a meaning” and that the question concerning “the meaning of

In: Brill's Companion to Camus

Mansfield registered her desire to live life to the full. Work, self, and spirit were to be in harmony, a courageous goal when one considers that she was extremely unwell. Her Journal entry of 11 October sets down all: By health I mean the power to live a full, adult, living, breathing life in close

In: Women Writing on the French Riviera

home’ in the world and, therefore, of being capable of living with the “ontological security” needed to make life meaningful. 23 Those who believe they are ‘at home,’ however, have lied to themselves, according to Camus, have taken an unjustifiable ‘leap of faith,’ or have otherwise betrayed a truth

In: Brill's Companion to Camus
Author: Patrick Hayden

philosophy that claim sovereignty over knowledge, truth, beauty, love, and even life itself. Similarly, The Rebel’s critique of “pathetic philosophers” (SC 207, OC III 367) who willingly sacrifice love and life to a transcendent history is motivated by a desire to break the “magic spell” cast by

In: Brill's Companion to Camus