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Author: Peter Childs

the power to liberate us from the tyranny of what was and is. mohsin hamid , ‘On the Dangers of Nostalgia’, Guardian , 25 February 2017 Borrowing a term from archaeology, ‘the contemporary past’, this essay focuses on the ways in which fiction shapes perceptions of events within living memory

In: Empowering Contemporary Fiction in English
Author: Judit Molnár

, the narrator is not able to gain a foothold in the unwelcoming society of Québec. At best, he can be part of the eccentric netherworld of refugees, among whom however he also feels dislocated, often considering himself superior to them. As a consequence, his sphere of social life becomes rather

In: Beirut to Carnival City
Author: Merritt Moseley

’s alive. But that life is the life of maggots, I tell W., devouring the substance of the university from the inside, living on its rotting. exodus 111 To insist, now, that reading Lars Iyer’s novels is a rich and fascinating experience even for a fellow humanities professor, that reading them is

In: The Campus Novel
Author: Lindsay Haney

over to profit-motivated foster care. As he grows up, he finds that he has to some extent a preference for men and for feminine pronouns, and [s]he invests substantial energy in finding a place for herself in her hometown before moving on to London and a series of adventures, including varieties of sex

In: Patrick McCabe’s Ireland
Author: Axel Goodbody

our way of life have been and remain hotly contested, especially in the United States, where climate change has become a matter of political ideology. In Europe, public concern over climate change has meanwhile been falling rather than rising (see European Commission 2017 ). It is widely accepted

In: Green Matters
Author: Syrine Hout

divides Beirut. In it the uncle wonders what his nephew’s life “is like on the East Side alone” (140), i.e. with no living parents, and invites him “to cross to West Beirut” (141) and live with him and his family, whom Bassam has never met. The offer to be embraced by a loving family in the “other” Beirut

In: Beirut to Carnival City
Author: Jeanne Ellis

of the memoir suggests in its canny reiteration of the word “Private”, which qualifies both the life of the biographical subject and the biographer’s relationship with him, intimacy and the privileged knowledge it affords authorise Jourdan’s public account, which is motivated by a sense of duty to

In: Neo-Victorian Biofiction
Author: Jeanne Ellis

of the memoir suggests in its canny reiteration of the word “Private”, which qualifies both the life of the biographical subject and the biographer’s relationship with him, intimacy and the privileged knowledge it affords authorise Jourdan’s public account, which is motivated by a sense of duty to

In: Neo-Victorian Biofiction
Author: Alex Hunt

in and between living organisms”. One literary critical method might proceed by describing “literature […], human experience, and the nonhuman environment as a nonhierarchical complex bound together by sign relations” ( Marin 2014 : 266). Accordingly, we must read novels, for example, not as

In: Green Matters
Author: Ewald Mengel

confront himself and his readers with something “bigger”: industry and economy. His intention was to compare campus life with the life “out there.” For the purpose of my essay I have selected two novelists and two novels that are apparently different from each other but also have a lot in common: John

In: The Campus Novel