Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 40 items for :

  • All: Living a Motivated Life x
  • Cultural History x
Clear All
Author: Martina Groß

have learned (from the stage) to what extent today’s literature is worked out as a problem at the desk and is made for the spectacles of the collector instead of for the ears of living human beings.” 12 Between February and June 1916, Hugo Ball staged a series of performances and soirées at the

In: Disasters of War
Author: Marie Kruger

that is equally invested in representing one of the central institutions of the new political dispensation and in commemorating the human rights violations of the past. “A campus for human rights”: this phrase—together with other temporal and spatial metaphors that reclaim the prison complex as “living

In: Matatu

little as the proverbial peacock did when on its way to a tea party, it happened upon a glittering event titled ‘Pride.’ With confidence, clearing its voice, tail feathers aloft, it waddled into a convention of motivated lions. But here I stand. For the purposes of a label, this paper is a causerie . In

In: Matatu
Author: Annie Gagiano

time or deliberate obscurantism needs to be queried, in line with Susan Sontag’s indignant words: To speak of reality becoming a spectacle is a breath-taking provincialism. It universalizes the viewing habits of a small, educated population living in the rich part of the world, where news has been

In: Matatu
Author: Kwok-kan Tam

is known to a person and affects the person’s choices in life. In this sense, Fate can also be considered as self-prediction and self-actualization. Similar to the cases of Oedipus and Macbeth, the oracle prediction or the witches’ prophecies serve only to motivate them into a chain of actions that

In: Fate and Prognostication in the Chinese Literary Imagination
Author: Yan Wei

life in a narrow attic in Shanghai and did not belong to any literary communities. Besides writing Lu Ping stories, Sun served as editor for a few detective journals such as Great Detective and The Blue Book . After 1949, Sun made a living by adapting historical plays for the Shanghai Opera House

In: Detecting Chinese Modernities
Author: Timo Airaksinen

do not explicate any theory of the relevant type of rationality. Irrational anticipation means more or less pathological pessimism, depression, or life in bad faith, which are psychological issues I cannot take into account here. Of course, anyone may become depressed after experiencing a long

In: Vagaries of Desire: A Collection of Philosophical Essays
Author: Timo Airaksinen

is in that case something else, like a fantasy based wish – perhaps a mildly delusional mental episode. Suppose I am in a life boat out on the ocean. I believe quite reasonably that ships sail around here and hence I may be rescued; if I believe that no ships ever go where I presently am, I stop

In: Vagaries of Desire: A Collection of Philosophical Essays
Author: Yan Wei

detective fiction presents a rich source for learning about the daily life and anxieties of Chinese—especially Shanghai urbanites—during the Republican era. To be more specific, Chinese detective works of that period capture two particularly noteworthy aspects of everyday life. First, they are witnesses

In: Detecting Chinese Modernities
Author: Timo Airaksinen

explain. “Rational” means that we are not interested in, say, plain urges or addictions; desires are motivated by some reasons that are based on the desirability of the desired objects. The basic idea is that I recognize an object, consider it attractive, and make a claim to it as if I demanded it. I want

In: Vagaries of Desire: A Collection of Philosophical Essays