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Author: Mihaela Precup

being done does not, in this case, include how-to manuals or misery memoirs. It is also quite significant that the narrator in O’Rourke’s book does not label herself a survivor, or embrace a return to living life to the fullest, something that grief tends to interrupt. In The Long Goodbye , the

In: Religious Narratives in Contemporary Culture
Author: Andrei Nae

is the belief that a principle of life or a set of vital properties govern living organisms. 23 This principle or set of properties transcend the physiology and chemistry of the body and are not to be found in non-living organisms. Although vitalism is a very broad term with a history which spans

In: Religious Narratives in Contemporary Culture

. The common good of a society so conceived is not that of liberal democracy but that of Catholicism and is better understood with Grisez’s words in mind: “Human life itself belongs to individual organisms, but it also exists in the common functions of sexual intercourse and procreation. Thus, there are

In: Religious Narratives in Contemporary Culture

, the excitement of visits like this one, the troubled presence of Soweto, there was much that would not exist in any more sophisticated society that contributed to giving Yudel’s experience of life a sharpness that in a truly free country it would have lacked. He hated the system under which he lived

In: Ideology in Postcolonial Texts and Contexts

that “the new creation, which is absolutely new … comes only through judgment and destruction” and that “annihilation … falls upon all.” 11 This stark dualism is seemingly motivated by a keen awareness of human limitation and a desire to showcase God’s sovereignty: “there is then no continuity … no

In: “To Recover What Has Been Lost”: Essays on Eschatology, Intertextuality, and Reception History in Honor of Dale C. Allison Jr.
Author: Anthony Miccoli

as a pervasive feeling that something isn’t quite right: that life could be better if circumstances were different.” 8 Most importantly, however, Dukkha is “the basic condition of life.” 9 Dukkha as “dis-ease” or a certain dissatisfaction, sense of incompleteness, or desire for relief of some

In: Religious Narratives in Contemporary Culture
Author: Mavis Reimer

development of the modern conception of childhood as a separate life stage emerged in Europe between the fifteenth and eighteenth centuries, together with bourgeois notions of family, home, privacy, and individuality” (5). Children’s literature as a genre distinct from schoolbooks, however, did not begin to

In: Ideology in Postcolonial Texts and Contexts

association emerges when Paul writes about his new life: “the life I now live in the flesh I live by faith in the Son of God, who loved me and gave himself for me (τοῦ ἀγαπήσαντός με καὶ παραδόντος ἑαυτὸν ὑπὲρ ἐμοῦ).” There is thus an evident connection in Eph 5:2, 25 with a specifically Pauline explication

In: “To Recover What Has Been Lost”: Essays on Eschatology, Intertextuality, and Reception History in Honor of Dale C. Allison Jr.

contemporary, Thevet, Belleforest conceived of his cosmography not just as a geography but as a true history of nations. 22 He therefore proposed to treat not only “the location of regions, their situations, limits, and extent” but also “the people living in them, the laws they follow, the religion they

In: Historical Communities

Besly in 1619, he informed his friend about the work that Justel was undertaking on his historical genealogy of the house of La Tour d’Auvergne. According to Duchesne, it was highly improbable that there existed, as Justel asserted, a Guillaume de la Tour, count of Clermont, living in 1020, or that the

In: Historical Communities