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Author: Minjung Ryu

This study examines how Melody, a Korean transnational girl in the US, participates in high school AP (Advanced Placement) biology class, engages in identity work, and learns science. Melody was a daughter of a gireogi family (a transnational family separated for educational purposes), living with her mother and brother in the US. The recent increase of transnational educational migration among Asian students and the importance of identity in understanding students’ learning and participation motivated this study. I define identity as a type of personhood and view that it is always performed and negotiated by individuals in their social lives. Drawing on ethnographic data collected in Melody’s AP Biology class, I will show Melody constructed identities as a non-participant, limited English-proficient student and incompetent biology learner. Her identity construction was influenced by the meso level contexts (e.g., school, classroom) and personal contexts (e.g., gireogi family contexts). Yet, Melody constantly negotiated with these contexts to re-figure her identities to be more conducive to her biology learning and to enhance her classroom participation. This study demonstrates how individual students in the US, while coming from a stereotypically successful ethnic group, experience their life contexts and explore possibilities for learning and being in different ways. Implications include how researchers and teachers should pay attention to individual differences and contexts in order to better facilitate their science learning and classroom participation. I will also provide implications for education in countries that send gireogi families and transnational students.

Open Access
In: Asia-Pacific Science Education

development of science and technology has a great influence on human life. In order to adapt to complex international problem situations, adaptable education must start to be provided early on in education systems ( NRC , 2000, 2012). However, current curriculums present various shortcomings. The current

Open Access
In: Asia-Pacific Science Education

-ranging negative effects on both the environment and the citizens of India (Denton & Sengupta, 2019). Left unchecked, such practices are predicted to have a profoundly negative impact on millions of people living in New Delhi and Chennai as scientists predict these cities will run out of water within the next

Open Access
In: Asia-Pacific Science Education

education as a way of developing its economy and raising living standards (Tan et al., 2014). The government invested not only in a quality teaching force (Tan, 2018), but also in a versatile education system with strategic educational policies to support economic growth (Tan et al., 2016). At the end of

Open Access
In: Asia-Pacific Science Education

education backgrounds and years of living in the United States, the participants’ English proficiency varied widely as well. 3 Critical STEM Literacy in an Afterschool Setting In designing a STEM afterschool program to engage Chin youths, we sought to engage the youths in the practices of

Open Access
In: Asia-Pacific Science Education
Author: Tali Tal

about the outdoors (natural history, archeology, and geography) in the outdoors and for the outdoors. But in the Israeli context, it encompassed a transition from the European urban life of the Jewish diaspora, where Jews were not allowed to own and cultivate land, to living in harmony with nature and

Open Access
In: Asia-Pacific Science Education
Authors: Ji-Ho Kim and Chan-Jong Kim

1 Introduction Ulrich Beck (1986) referred to modern society as a risk society that produces risks such as climate change, financial crises, and nuclear crises. Such risks seem to be irreversible, global, uncertain, socially out of control, and threatening the existence of life on Earth

Open Access
In: Asia-Pacific Science Education

, Sincere experienced structural and symbolic racism in his life, limiting opportunities to rightfully belong in science. One of his teachers labeled him a disruptive “problem that needed solving.” He had a record of getting in trouble, preventing opportunities to participate in enrichment programs. He was

Open Access
In: Asia-Pacific Science Education
Chapter 12 Analogies in Biomimicry

solutions. A field that teaches how to dive into the science found in nature and how to apply this in sustainable design, is Biomimicry. “Biomimicry seeks not to copy nature exactly, or use organisms’ directly for our benefit, or to fill rooms with the beauty of living things, but seeks to emulate design

In: Design-Based Concept Learning in Science and Technology Education
Chapter 2 Design-Based Learning in Science and Technology as Integrated STEM

their preconceptions (after all the experimental situation, like the air track, is rather artificial and hardly related to daily life). Design challenges, however, are not artificial. Let us take the example of designing a boat as a strategy for learning about sinking and floating. This activity

In: Design-Based Concept Learning in Science and Technology Education