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Authors: Joy Higgs and Daniel Radovich

Creativity is a central source of meaning in our lives … most of the things that are interesting, important, and human are the results of creativity. … when we are involved in it, we feel that we are living more fully than during the rest of life. ( Csikszentmihalyi, 2013 , pp. 1-2) Creativity and

In: Challenging Future Practice Possibilities
Authors: Franziska Trede and Joy Higgs

teacher or a parent (and so on) and are acting according to social expectations, living up to commitments and routine pathways. Receiving affirmative feedback about actions taken strengthens identity agency and a sense of belonging to a community. Positive feedback motivates reproduction of practices and

In: Challenging Future Practice Possibilities

Global Scenarios Group 1 envisaged a divided “Fortress World” future on the one hand and on the other a “Great Transition” future in which the world rejects many of the values of market-driven societies to return to more sustainable ways of living ( Raskin et al., 2002 ). These scenarios have been

In: Challenging Future Practice Possibilities
Authors: Debbie Horsfall and Joy Higgs

worth living in for the many not just the few? – Are universities educating global democratic ethical citizens or citizens for a neoliberal white Western view of capitalist democracy? Universities are actors in this space: they have agency and power. At the moment it feels as if they are doing the

In: Challenging Future Practice Possibilities

futures in workplaces, and in community life more broadly. We have used the idea of helping students learn to address wicked problems as a way of advancing an argument about education for problem solving. Recognising that there are different kinds of problems, with different kinds of solution methods, is

In: Challenging Future Practice Possibilities
Author: Angel Ruiz

emphasis on real contexts was added This was synonymous with “mathematics for life,” something that everyone would agree on. The reformers felt it necessary to design an “image” of the curriculum that would allow its proper “marketing.” Working with real contexts, however, did not obey only to a political

In: International Handbook of Mathematics Teacher Education: Volume 2

living in poverty and was labelled a “failing” school in 2011 because its standardised mathematics test scores fell in the bottom 5% of schools across the state. When schools fail by measure of test scores, both academic and public discourse about such failure can generate a view of the professionals who

In: International Handbook of Mathematics Teacher Education: Volume 3

are dialogically developed in the interface between their intimate terrain and the practices and discourses to which they are exposed in the present. On this basis, we conceptualize a teacher’s professional identity as “a set of self-understandings related to ways of being, living, and projecting into

In: International Handbook of Mathematics Teacher Education: Volume 3

Orlando persevered through his grief because s/he “was of a strong constitution and the disease never broke him as it has broken many of his peers” (p. 75). Nevertheless, although Orlando re-enters daily life and perseveres with a hopeful spirit, her thoughts and feelings are now tinged with a lingering

In: Grieving as a Teacher’s Curriculum

natural disaster, financial loss); and loss due to aliving death” (i.e., separation by divorce or incarceration). Each of these experiences affects a person’s daily life, influences his or her interactions with others, and alters one’s views of the world. Hence, they have a great deal to do with

In: Grieving as a Teacher’s Curriculum