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source document, Kannaday posits that scribes performed a systematic reworking of the transmissional lines. However, Kannaday claims there was no such systematic work. Even if there is some credence to the claim concerning apologetically motivated scribal alterations, it was in no way systematic

In: History of the Pauline Corpus in Texts, Transmissions and Trajectories

(to AD  300) has long been recognized as ‘wild,’ ‘uncontrolled,’ ‘unedited.’ ” 23 The wild development supposedly ended with a textual standardization motivated by ecclesiastical powers. As Parker explains, “the growth of influence of a number of key sees, particularly Antioch, Alexandria

In: History of the Pauline Corpus in Texts, Transmissions and Trajectories

the original words of the New Testament.” 83 The two scholars contended the many new finds and transcriptions by Tischendorf had thoroughly supplanted the late date of the mss. used to create the TR . The new material motivated and warranted creating a new text independent of the TR . 84

In: History of the Pauline Corpus in Texts, Transmissions and Trajectories

. Late antiquity was an era of expansion for Christian liturgical life across the Mediterranean. A major feature of this development was the emergence during the fourth century of trained choirs for liturgical service, along with new forms of hymnography crafted to highlight their participation. 6 In

In: Wisdom on the Move: Late Antique Traditions in Multicultural Conversation

. Late antiquity was an era of expansion for Christian liturgical life across the Mediterranean. A major feature of this development was the emergence during the fourth century of trained choirs for liturgical service, along with new forms of hymnography crafted to highlight their participation. 6 In

In: Wisdom on the Move: Late Antique Traditions in Multicultural Conversation
Author: Miriam Frenkel

assuring them that indeed he prays for them day and night at the gates of the holy city. 40 Although living in the Holy Land was ascribed religious value (by both Rabbinates and Karaites alike), leaving Palestine in pursuit of a more comfortable life in Egypt was not at all condemned. On the contrary

In: Israel in Egypt: The Land of Egypt as Concept and Reality for Jews in Antiquity and the Early Medieval Period
Author: Craig Perry

left his family, put his concubine up in her own living quarters in the countryside, and then bought her “fine garments the likes of which his wife had never worn.” 30 Another Jewish woman’s plight is the subject of a series of twelfth-century petitions to a head (nagid) of the Jewish community. Her

In: Israel in Egypt: The Land of Egypt as Concept and Reality for Jews in Antiquity and the Early Medieval Period

familiar and reversed in a way that Michel Foucault has called heterotopia. 81 Unlike utopia set in the idealized nowhere, e.g. celestial Jerusalem, heterotopia is recognized as part of reality but a reality outside the concrete sphere of experienced life, providing an experimental space so to say to test

In: Israel in Egypt: The Land of Egypt as Concept and Reality for Jews in Antiquity and the Early Medieval Period

Negation of the Exile in the Messianic Doctrine of the Karaite Mourners of Zion,” HUCA 68 (1997): 109–40. See also a recent publication by Sasson, Proverbs , 121–23. On mainstream (Rabbanite) Judaism as upholding the diasporic model of life which enabled the Jewish nation and religion to exist and

In: Israel in Egypt: The Land of Egypt as Concept and Reality for Jews in Antiquity and the Early Medieval Period