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name just a few from this volume: demons, dualism, evil, eternal life, cosmic struggles, Urzeit, Endzeit, dreams, priests, the temple, symbolism, interpretive angels, heavenly realms, eschatological judgment, and angelic warfare. The multitude of focuses reflected in this volume, in turn, highlights

In: Dead Sea Discoveries

trained in the Qur’an and hadith traditions, or simply someone living in Muslim world and familiar with feminist Islamic scholarship to look at scrolls from their perspective. Similarly, surely something would be learned if the scrolls were read by a monk or nun from the Buddhist monastic tradition, with

In: Dead Sea Discoveries

primary feature of Jubilees. 2 This essay examines two cases in which Jubilees omits biblical chronological data—one involves the age of Noah; the other, a reference to Abram living for ten years in the land of Canaan that appears in the context of the gifting of Hagar. In each instance the author of

In: Dead Sea Discoveries
Author: Yonatan Adler

Pharisees during the 1st century BCE were a group which competed against the ruling priestly class in trying to win influence over the hearts of the people, and in so doing advocated the “democratization” of Judaism as an ideal. As a popular movement, the Pharisees wished to motivate as large a circle of

In: Dead Sea Discoveries
Author: Craig A. Evans

. In the vicinity of Caesarea Philippi, Jesus asks his disciples who they think he is. Peter replies: “You are the Christ, the Son of the living God” (Matt 16:16). In a recent study Mark Goodwin has suggested that Peter’s language, σὺ εἶ ὁ χριστὸς ὁ υἱὸς τοῦ θεοῦ τοῦ ζῶντος, alludes to Hosea, where

In: The Book of the Twelve
Author: Jonathan Vroom

themselves in Damascus. 11 These texts likely reflect an Essene community that was integrated into Judean life and spread across Palestine in groups called ‘camps’ ( מחנות ). 12 Unlike the S community, D depicts a non-celibate family setting, and unlike S, D contains sections of halakhah that addresses

In: The Authority of Law in the Hebrew Bible and Early Judaism
Author: Jonathan Vroom

“desperate illogicality.” 53 If the Chronicler’s interpretive efforts were truly motivated by the consistency requirement of the rule of law, he would not have left a text that threatens the possibility requirement. What distinguishes TS’s interpretive conflict-harmonizing is that, unlike 2 Chr 35:13 (as

In: The Authority of Law in the Hebrew Bible and Early Judaism
Author: Rony Kozman

(Ezek 37:5, 6, 9, 10, 14)—also pictured as the spirit breathing ( מארבע רוחות באי הרוח ופחי ) in the dead so that they may live ( ויחיו ) (37:9)—alludes to God’s creation of adam in Gen 2:7: God “breathed ( ויפח ) into his nostrils the breath of life ( נשמת חיים ); and the adam became a living being

In: Dead Sea Discoveries
Author: John J. Collins

argued, “it was not academic interest which motivated the Qumranic scribes in their editorial work but rather the changes which had taken place in the life and practices of the community.” 17 In her view, “the purpose of the document was not to serve as a prescriptive law book in the modern sense, but

In: Dead Sea Discoveries
Author: Cecilia Wassen

context of Jesus’s deeds and words. 1 This is a valid approach, since the scrolls provide a window into the Jewish world with a common apocalyptic outlook shared by Jesus and his disciples who were Jews—a worldview characterized by the belief that they were living at the end of the present era, in the

In: Dead Sea Discoveries