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Author: Thomas E. Hunt

consequently it ‘offer[s] to the reader a possible way of being-in-the-world, a new way of living in the world.’ 7 Fundamentally, the Life of Hilarion asks the reader to emplot her own life into the general narrative of salvation encountered in scripture and in the Life itself. 8 Moments of ethical

In: Jerome of Stridon and the Ethics of Literary Production in Late Antiquity
Author: Thomas E. Hunt

published in London in 1876 reimagines the life of Jovinian, a monk who was condemned by Jerome and others in the 390s. 12 It begins with a lengthy preface which claims that the book will illuminate ‘that mighty system of imposture which has exercised its baneful influence over a large portion of the human

In: Jerome of Stridon and the Ethics of Literary Production in Late Antiquity

asked him, and he would have given you living water” (4:10). The Roman soldiers are unable to grasp that Jesus is the true source of life and thirst-quenching drink. When Jesus finally dies, his death is narrated with restraint. The evangelist presents Jesus’s death not as a moment of agony, but as

In: Johannine Christology
Author: Jonathan Numada

, reference is made to the unrighteous being blotted out of the Book of the Living ( 1 En. 108.3; 47.3). While the Psalm in its final form probably had nothing to do with the life of David or eschatology, this is probably how the Psalms were received by some parties. 52 Like the Psalmist, David is

In: Johannine Christology
Author: Andrew W. Pitts

some “belonging to the Peripatetic school” copy Moses in deploying wisdom as a lantern holder (cf. John 5:35) that, if followed, will result in peace for the philosopher’s entire life (Eusebius, Hist. eccl. 13.12.9–16; Aristobulus Frag. 5.9–10). As with R. Ishmael in the revelations recorded in 3

In: Johannine Christology
Author: Thomas E. Hunt

time. 25 This suggests that he was at least partly motivated by a desire to establish himself as a commentator with a presence in Rome. 26 The Commentary on Galatians also needs to be placed within Jerome’s ongoing engagement with translation and arguments about the language of scripture. In the

In: Jerome of Stridon and the Ethics of Literary Production in Late Antiquity
Author: Thomas E. Hunt

thinking about the nature of language (whether spoken or written) and its role in the common life of Christians. More specifically, he subsumed language within a framework that was ethical and related to the Bible. One of the key themes in the Pauline commentaries is this same connection between scriptural

In: Jerome of Stridon and the Ethics of Literary Production in Late Antiquity
Author: Thomas E. Hunt

reading within a wider Christian tradition. The centrepiece of this letter is the third chapter. Here Jerome notes, citing the Apocalypse of John, that in scripture people living on the earth (terra ) are always called sinners. 8 This leads him in to an extended treatment of Hebrews 11–12 and its

In: Jerome of Stridon and the Ethics of Literary Production in Late Antiquity
Author: Lindsey Trozzo

Christology that some have found troublesome for the pursuit of Johannine ethics. 7 Because the Fourth Gospel lacks the expected forms of moral instruction (gnomes, maxims, paraenetic sections), many have looked instead to imitation ethics, that is, to the presentation of Jesus’s life for a model of behavior

In: Johannine Christology