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. 16 In Ancient Near Eastern Texts Pritchard translates the term ʾuḫryt as “further [life]”, 17 also the Akkadian phrase ana aḫrat ūmē 18 (lit. ‘in the back of days’, cf. Engl. idiom. ‘at the end of the day’) has been invoked as a cognate of the OT expression. Combining the material of

In: The Semantics of Qurʾanic Language: al-Āḫira
Author: Aiyub Palmer

5.1 Introduction Thus far, we have shown how al-Tirmidhī’s concept of sainthood did not appear out of a vacuum, nor was it on the fringe of the Islamic mystical tradition. Important social and political factors were at play in motivating al-Tirmidhī to propose a new approach to Islamic sainthood

In: Sainthood and Authority in Early Islam: Al-Ḥakīm al-Tirmidhī’s Theory of wilāya and the Reenvisioning of the Sunnī Caliphate
Author: Aiyub Palmer

the moral and spiritual welfare of his students as well as those who came to hear him lecture. One book that indicates this aspect of his life and teaching is Al-munājāt 93 , a series of prayers and supplications that express the dire helplessness of the servant who seeks God. 94 Also written

In: Sainthood and Authority in Early Islam: Al-Ḥakīm al-Tirmidhī’s Theory of wilāya and the Reenvisioning of the Sunnī Caliphate
Author: Etan Kohlberg

1 Introduction Students of Imāmī Shiʿism have long noticed the central place which taqiyya in its various forms occupies in the life and thought of Shiʿis. Some scholars have explained this phenomenon by referring to the position of the Shiʿis as a minority within the surrounding Sunni

In: In Praise of the Few. Studies in Shiʿi Thought and History
Author: Etan Kohlberg

Uṣūlī position, that the single most important source of law is the traditions of the Imams. These provide the community with an infallible guide to all aspects of life; they are also indispensable for a correct understanding of the Qurʾan and the Prophet’s utterances. Indeed, without the exegesis of

In: In Praise of the Few. Studies in Shiʿi Thought and History

vindicated the call of a man, Muḥammad b. ʿAbdullāh. Motivated by a reason, driven by a cause or inspired by a divine call he—the prophet to be—spoke on behalf of the divine in high literary form. He was eventually recognized as messenger and his message accumulated the kind of reverence and authority

In: The Semantics of Qurʾanic Language: al-Āḫira

have been rather unaffected by previous attempts to rehabilitate al-Ghazālī’s reputation. These had been motivated more by aspects of the ideological campaign of the Almohads to oust the Almoravids from power 4 than by a commitment to lend full official support to pro-Ghazālian Sufis. 5 As we will

In: Philosophical Theology in Islam